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On reflection

Cruel ironies of Alabama abortion ban

A volunteer’s view from Tijuana: The long, uncertain slog to ‘the other side’

Part 2 of 2

Abby Nathanson, who directs a leadership program for Latino high school students and a residential fellowship year for college graduates at Grace Episcopal Church in Millbrook, spent her Christmas holiday in Tijuana. As described in the first part of this series, Abby is fluent in Spanish and French, and made herself most useful by preparing migrants for the “credible fear” interviews, their first step of the asylum-seeking process.  

A volunteer’s view from Tijuana: The long, uncertain slog to ‘the other side’

Part 1 of 2

Note from the author: This series is based on a long face-to-face interview with Sharon, Conn.,  resident Abby Nathanson, clarifications she provided in response to emailed questions, as well as photos, statistics, and several articles Abby sent to enrich my piece. Finally, my understanding of the asylum process was augmented by news articles on Tijuana and immigration at the southern border.

 

Welcoming our local immigrants

Given the aggressive anti-immigrant drumbeat from the White House, the immigrants in our communities need a little extra help these days — if only in a welcoming smile.

If most of us have been shaken by our president’s lack of any understanding or compassion for immigrants either inside our country or at our border, families who are new to this country, and whose status may be uncertain, must feel quite traumatized to find themselves here. What is their future? Is this the country where they dreamed of feeling safe?

A volunteer’s view from Tijuana: The long, uncertain slog to ‘the other side’

Part 2 of 2

Note from the author: This series is based on a long face-to-face interview with Sharon resident Abby Nathanson, clarifications she provided in response to emailed questions, as well as photos, statistics, and several articles Abby sent to enrich my piece. Finally, my understanding of the asylum process was augmented by news articles on Tijuana and immigration at the southern border.

 

A volunteer’s view from Tijuana: The long, uncertain slog to ‘the other side’

Part 1 of 2

Note from the author: This series is based on a long face-to-face interview with Sharon resident Abby Nathanson, clarifications she provided in response to emailed questions, as well as photos, statistics, and several articles Abby sent to enrich my piece. Finally, my understanding of the asylum process was augmented by news articles on Tijuana and immigration at the southern border.

 

The back of the line

I admit it. I probably don’t realize how often I should be asking a question until suddenly I’m stunned by the answer. This is what happened when I read “Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen,” by Jose Antonio Vargas, a successful journalist, immigration activist, and perhaps our most famous undocumented American. For years, I’ve heard people complain: They don’t have a problem with immigrants, what they mind is the ones who’ve come here illegally. Why don’t these people play by the rules and go to the back of the line? 

The realities of being an undocumented immigrant today in the USA

I admit it. I probably don’t realize how often I should be asking a question until suddenly I’m stunned by the answer. This is what happened when I read “Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen,” by Jose Antonio Vargas, a successful journalist, immigration activist, and perhaps our most famous undocumented American. For years, I’ve heard people complain: They don’t have a problem with immigrants, what they mind is the ones who’ve come here illegally. Why don’t these people play by the rules and go to the back of the line? 

The citizenship question: Trump’s pet project

On Jan. 15, Judge Jesse Furman of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York blocked the Trump administration’s attempt to add its controversial question about citizenship status to the 2020 Census. As the judge declared in his ruling, the citizenship question could dissuade more than 24 million residents from filling out the census. The Trump administration is expected to appeal the decision, with the U.S. Supreme Court making its decision before June.