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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Fraud is rampant, even in the Northwest Corner

There are some who may think their local community weekly newspaper is not actually a business, but it certainly is. Proof of that fact came to the fore last week when this small business’ checking account was apparently hacked, and a fraudulent check written from our checking account to a person out West for almost $9,000, purportedly for a camper that person had put up for sale.

Letters to the Editor - Lakeville Journal - 7-18-19

Let’s move forward on the water septic problem

In response to Martha Lane’s July 11 comments in The Lakeville Journal on West Cornwall’s septic problem:

She doesn’t agree that the proposed system would be part of Cornwall’s infrastructure. It may be a stretch to compare this to a school, but how does it differ from roads or bridges that are routinely maintained or replaced to serve a limited number of homes?

A true consensus on community septic systems looked for in Cornwall

The June 28 Cornwall Town Informational Meeting about a Community WasteWater System for West Cornwall triggered substantial attendance. As the chair of the West Cornwall Water/Septic Study Committee, I was reinvigorated by the lively debate.

Turning Back The Pages

100 years ago — July 1919

More than 16,000 horses in Connecticut were displaced by motor vehicles in the past decade, it was seen by figures obtained at the capitol. Statistics prepared in the office of Tax Commissioner William H. Corbin revealed that the horse population of the state dropped from 75,779 in 1908 to 59,737 last year, while records of the motor vehicle department showed that the number of horseless vehicles leaped from 7,895 to 95,650. Five automobiles appeared for every horse removed.

 

What should UConn do with its football team?

The current consternation over the future of the University of Connecticut’s football program has exploded some myths about the way big time college sports are and are not paid for at UConn.

No heroes for state’s right to know

At its annual meeting the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information usually presents an award to a public official who has performed outstanding service to the right to know in the past year. But no such award was presented at the annual meeting a few weeks ago, for the council could not find such a hero.

Taking responsibility for babies: Where are the men?

You have seen them on the news, on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court: women wearing modest red gowns and white bonnets silently protesting the loss of reproductive rights. This is nothing new. Women have been trying to gain control over their own bodies for thousands of years.

LaBonne’s Market

Bob LaBonne Jr., works with young people in all three of his stores. Reliable employees are crucial to the success of his business. Only 20% of his employees live in Salisbury and of that 20%, 80% are young and live at home with their families. He states, “The average commute for his staff is 30 minutes with some traveling 45 minutes from as far as Torrington and other distant towns.” 

Belling the cat: Russian cyber warfare

You may or may not know about “Bellingcat.” An independent investigative association based in Leicester, England,  Bellingcat (name derived from the fabled question: “But who will bell the cat?”) has been for several years pursuing and reporting on clandestine Russian operations to undermine Western democracy, by carrying out weaponized cyber-hacking, spying, assassinations and other criminal acts around the world.