Login

The beauty of nature as a stress reducer

Summer is a great time to get out in nature, and new research proves that doing so can reduce stress. 
A study conducted by Frontiers in Psychology found that spending 20 minutes in nature can lead to a drop in the stress hormone cortisol. 
The cortisol levels were measured, reported by Harvard Health in their July 2019 newsletter, by taking saliva samples from volunteers before and after nature outings. 
Thirty-six people were asked to spend at least 10 minutes in a natural setting, three days a week for eight weeks. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Possible breakthrough in psychosis detection

Language patterns may help detect early signs of psychosis, according to a recent study conducted at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. 
Computer programming was used to “analyze patterns of speech from 40 people enrolled in a long-term study of youth who are at risk of developing psychosis,” according to a report on the study published at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) website. 
The subjects were chosen due to their “unusual patterns of thought, perception and communication.” 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Why strawberries are somewhat my everything

My first introduction to strawberries was in the third grade, while reading “Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief.” Those of us who have a more than fond appreciation for Greek mythology can trace our roots back to this series. 
In this book, Percy Jackson, a half-mortal, half-god 12-year-old must leave his safe-haven camp (known as Camp Half-Blood) and venture into the perilous mortal world of Brooklyn, N.Y., undetected. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Lyme disease primer as the tick population rises

Although a variant was first reported in Europe in 1883, the first known outbreak of what has come to be known as Lyme disease (LD) occurred in Old Lyme, Conn., in 1975. 
LD has spread across the country to all 50 states and is now the most common tick-borne disease in the Northern hemisphere with more than 30,000 diagnosed and reported each year (a small fraction of the population that has actually been infected). 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Be cool, fool: Mayonnaise, pies and smoked salmon

As I write this article, I’m at my desk eating shrimp and a mayo-based potato salad that have been sitting unrefrigerated for about four hours.
This is a bad idea, I’m discovering, not because the food is making me sick (yet), but because I’m reading warnings that are very serious and strict from the Centers for Disease Control about not doing exactly what I’m doing. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

In which I learn to love rhubarb (at last)

It’s that time of year again, when I talk about how much I don’t like rhubarb. But this year it’s different; this year, I’ve decided that I’m such a fan of rhubarb that I went out and spent actual money to buy a rhubarb plant of my own.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Shocking and sad rise in teen suicide

Suicide is the second leading cause of death in the United States for people between the ages of 10 and 34 and the fourth leading cause of death for people between 35 and 54.
I found that news incredible and was especially disturbed to think that children as young as 10 are acting successfully on their suicidal impulses. 
I got this information  from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) website; they had gathered their data from the Centers for Disease Control. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Older adults might need a new measles shot

If you have a child, then you probably know whether or not he or she has had a measles vaccine (usually listed on the record sheet from your pediatrician as MMR, standing for measles, mumps, rubella). Most parents will get the shot for their children as part of standard operating procedure.
But if you’re an older adult chances are that you don’t know whether you’ve had a measles vaccine. Until recently, it wouldn’t have mattered whether you could remember because health officials said in 2000 that measles had been eliminated in the United States.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Fine foraged food, now in season

There has been one sighting in Sharon already — but so far, most of my foraging contacts tell me it’s still too early for morels, those divine little wild mushrooms that look like a cross between a brain and a dwarf’s hat.
They are delicious sautéed in butter and served with rich foods such as roasted potatoes and scrambled eggs and hamburgers.  

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

An ode to the humble green bean

In “Walden,” Henry David Thoreau recounted his experience growing what he estimated to be a 7 mile length of bean plants. It was certainly a Herculean task, especially considering that he had few tools other than his hoe. And all the more so since, sadly, he took little or no pleasure in eating the beans — only in planting, cultivating and selling them.
Chinese are the champions

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.