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In which I justify eating white bread (but it has to be good)

What’s the point of writing about white bread in this glorious summer season of corn and tomatoes and melons and cucumbers and eggplant and on and on?
I’ve been feeling guilty about my consumption levels of white bread and I’ll tell you why in a moment. 
But first, why am I eating white bread at all, especially when there is so much other good stuff to eat? Part of my guilt process is to seek self justification. I’ve been digging deep and trying to figure out why bread is in fact an important part of my diet.

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 Tips for avoiding falls

NORTH CANAAN — Falls are under-reported, according to Mike Mangini, who is director of Outpatient Physical Therapy at Geer in North Canaan. 
Many older people fear if they tell someone they’ve fallen, they will be forced into care and will lose their independence. 

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The sound of summer interns cracking their knuckles

The common sounds of an office include shuffling paper, the whirring of a printer, your colleague’s pesky cough he can’t seem to shake, and (often) the unmistakable sound of someone cracking knuckles. 
That someone might very well be me.
The increasing pressure on my knuckles throughout the day melts away after a sudden “pop.”

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Peachy keen idea for a dairy-free cobbler

Peaches hold the distinction of being the only fruit that, when you search for them on Google, the first results are for a Canadian punk rocker.
The connection seems odd, since peaches, at least to me, evoke peaceful scenes of sitting on my front porch on a summer evening. 
This ironic use is not limited to rockers. Baseball fans will recall that Ty Cobb, who sharpened his spikes to harm opposing players, was known as The Georgia Peach. I would think that the infielders who bore the brunt of Cobb’s wrath did not regard him as a peachy man. 

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Oceans, lakes and a peaceful state of mind

Almost any memorable summer comes with a party, a picnic or some other form of get-together — preferably on a beach, by an ocean or by a lake. 
For me, it’s lakes all the way. I don’t like sand; seaweed is the bane of my mortal existence on this planet; and I would rather be fed to sharks than sit in the car, all sticky from salt water, and drive home two hours from the beach back to my land-locked house in the middle of West Hartford. 

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The beauty of nature as a stress reducer

Summer is a great time to get out in nature, and new research proves that doing so can reduce stress. 
A study conducted by Frontiers in Psychology found that spending 20 minutes in nature can lead to a drop in the stress hormone cortisol. 
The cortisol levels were measured, reported by Harvard Health in their July 2019 newsletter, by taking saliva samples from volunteers before and after nature outings. 
Thirty-six people were asked to spend at least 10 minutes in a natural setting, three days a week for eight weeks. 

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Possible breakthrough in psychosis detection

Language patterns may help detect early signs of psychosis, according to a recent study conducted at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. 
Computer programming was used to “analyze patterns of speech from 40 people enrolled in a long-term study of youth who are at risk of developing psychosis,” according to a report on the study published at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) website. 
The subjects were chosen due to their “unusual patterns of thought, perception and communication.” 

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Why strawberries are somewhat my everything

My first introduction to strawberries was in the third grade, while reading “Percy Jackson: The Lightning Thief.” Those of us who have a more than fond appreciation for Greek mythology can trace our roots back to this series. 
In this book, Percy Jackson, a half-mortal, half-god 12-year-old must leave his safe-haven camp (known as Camp Half-Blood) and venture into the perilous mortal world of Brooklyn, N.Y., undetected. 

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A Lyme disease primer as the tick population rises

Although a variant was first reported in Europe in 1883, the first known outbreak of what has come to be known as Lyme disease (LD) occurred in Old Lyme, Conn., in 1975. 
LD has spread across the country to all 50 states and is now the most common tick-borne disease in the Northern hemisphere with more than 30,000 diagnosed and reported each year (a small fraction of the population that has actually been infected). 

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Be cool, fool: Mayonnaise, pies and smoked salmon

As I write this article, I’m at my desk eating shrimp and a mayo-based potato salad that have been sitting unrefrigerated for about four hours.
This is a bad idea, I’m discovering, not because the food is making me sick (yet), but because I’m reading warnings that are very serious and strict from the Centers for Disease Control about not doing exactly what I’m doing. 

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