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The Winsted Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Santa Claus lives in everyone

Once again we are in the midst of the Christmas season, when we shop for (and sometimes panic over) gifts for friends and family, spend time licking and licking Christmas card envelopes and enjoy listening to the cheery (and oftentimes annoying) holiday songs that come on the radio.

In the midst of all the holiday cheer, commercialism and consumerism, we should pause for a moment to be thankful for what we have.

Whether it is friends, family, food or simply a roof over your head, many people do not have any of these things.

We can hope for an adequate Trump presidency

Let me be perfectly clear, as Richard Nixon liked to say before he wasn’t, I fervently hope Donald Trump turns out to be an adequate president, because we can’t afford less than that modest wish.

I have no illusions he will be a great or even a good president, but if he does no lasting harm in the next four years, a healthy chunk of a grateful nation will finally exhale. In the meantime, he continues to confound with his bluster, his ego, his ignorance, his hidden tax returns and various ethical questions.

Under the media radar

There is a clear and present danger to America, and it goes way beyond people’s fears of the Supreme Court nominees you will be hearing about over the coming months.
I do not know of a business that can be run any more without the Internet, and that includes all the car manufacturers, every single restaurant or fast food chain, every Hollywood studio, every bus company, every train operator, Facebook, Twitter, every trucking and shipping company, every oil company … the list is 100 percent long for every business in America.

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Winter begins in hope

It is one of the regrets of my romantic heart in these modern times never to have dashed through the snow in a one-horse open sleigh. I won’t settle for a plodding hay ride; I want the full experience, on an unplowed country road, icy stars above and the warm lights of home in the distance. I can imagine developing a deeper connection to Robert Frost and Prokofiev. Even “Jingle Bells” would somehow become more to me than an innocuous old holiday chestnut.

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Reflections on the fate of the 9/11 case

Part 3 of 3

In Part 2, Church described the lengths to which the CIA was willing to go to suppress evidence of its torture of prisoners held at its “black sites.” This column will speak of the dire threat the CIA poses to the military commissions themselves.

Trump and his betraying makeover

Attention workers who voted for Trump, either eagerly or as a vote against the hawkish, Wall Street favorite, Hillary Clinton: Donald Trump, less than a month after the election, has already begun to betray you.

Nourishing the spirit

If it seems as if the holiday spirit is in too short a supply around your house this year, even after the first annual viewing of some family members’ favorite holiday movies and such activities, there are ways to increase the good will to all that is so necessary to enjoying the shortest and darkest days of the year. You will have your own ideas — and this year we would really like to hear about them through the written word on our opinion pages — but here are a couple of suggestions to get you on your way.

Remember Pearl Harbor

Hard to believe it’s been 75 years since that Sunday the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, even harder to believe I can vividly recall something that happened 75 years ago.

There aren’t that many of us who actually “remember Pearl Harbor,” as the war’s first popular song urged. The principals are long gone — Franklin D. Roosevelt, George Marshall, Emperor Hirohito and the architect of the attack, the Harvard-educated American-admirer Admiral Yamamoto. Only about 600,000 of the 16 million Americans who served in the war survive. 

Trump Letters