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The Winsted Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

U.S. should stay out of Libya

The Sheldon Richman Column

It’s good to see that the Pentagon is unenthusiastic about military intervention in Libya. But that hasn’t stopped armchair generals such as Sen. John Kerry from pushing for a no-fly zone over that country.

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Gilbert agreement is both relieving and distressing

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Tuesday night’s announcement that representatives from The Gilbert School and Winchester Public Schools had agreed on the draft agreement of a three-year contract between the semi-private high school and the public school system was relieving on one hand but somewhat distressing on the other.
Gilbert and the municipal school board have agreed that seventh- and eighth-graders will be relocated to Gilbert beginning this fall. The agreement was expected to be ratified Thursday night, and the fact that board members from both sides were able to reach a final accord was good news.

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Time to get rid of Connecticut Siting Council?

Guest Commentary

Nothing can wreck your day like the Connecticut Siting Council (CSC), that overarching entity with authority to run gas pipelines and high-tension corridors through our backyards, site cell towers where they don’t belong and humble once-mighty ridgelines with huge broadcast towers.
This council’s review is supposed to balance “public need” with “environmental compatibility,” but environment always seems to get short shrift, not to mention property values.

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New national movement points taxpayers in the right direction

The Winsted Journal Editorial

From Wisconsin to Winsted, it is impossible to escape the fiscal nightmare being played out in towns and states across the country, where political leaders are bickering over mountains of debt. But beyond the disagreements over cutting spending versus raising taxes, American taxpayers should have been flabbergasted and outraged last week when they were reminded that nearly two-thirds of U.S. corporations pay no income tax and that 83 of the top 100 publicly traded companies here use offshore tax havens to shelter their income from taxes.

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They’re ‘Mad as Hell’ in Madison — and with good reason

In The Public Interest

The large demonstrations at the state Capitol in Madison, Wisc., are driven by a middle-class awakening to the specter of its destruction by the corporate reactionaries and their toady Gov. Scott Walker.       

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Memoirs of Colebrook River, VII

Historic Bytes

The farmers are employing the new technology of silos in this continued recollection of life along Colebrook River, written by Helen Seymour in the 1950s:
“Mr. Northway, Mr. Bourquin, Mr. Verchot, Mr. Hurd and Father furnished teams with hay rigs on the wagons to use in bringing the long corn stalks to the cutter.
“The day before the machine came, the extra men arrived with hand corn knives and cut some of the corn, laying the long stalks so they could be easily picked up and placed on the wagons.

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Time to topple corporate dictators

In The Public Interest

The 18-day, non-violent Egyptian protests for freedom raise a question: Is America next?
Were Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine around, they would likely say, “What are we waiting for?” They would be appalled by the concentration of economic and political power in such a few hands. Remember how often these two men warned about concentrated power.   

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When will George W. Bush be tried for his war crimes?

The Sheldon Richman Column

We should take a small measure of satisfaction in former President George W. Bush’s cancellation of his trip to Switzerland after human-rights groups threatened to bring legal action against him for authorizing torture.
Persons detained by the U.S. government after 9/11 were subjected to what the Bush administration euphemistically called “enhanced interrogation,” including waterboarding. In reality those methods constituted torture, violating U.S. law and international agreements.

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Memoirs of Colebrook River, Part VI

Historic Bytes

Helen Seymour’s story continues:
“Grandfather loved to tell this story about Mr. George Ives and the teapot.
“One day a woman came into Mr. Ives’ General Store wanting to purchase a teapot. The teapots were hanging on hooks on the top row of shelves. Mr. Ives would slide one off the hook with a long stick and catch it as it fell.

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Civic institutions essential for Egypt’s Revolution

In The Public Interest

Colman McCarthy, a former Washington Post writer and founder of the Center for Teaching Peace, must be very happy with the news from Egypt. For 25 years, McCarthy has been persuading high schools and colleges to adopt peace studies in their curriculum (for more information, contact him at cmccarthy@starpower.net). Now he has another example of a largely non-violent revolution — led by young people of all backgrounds — successfully ousting a dictatorial regime.

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