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The Winsted Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Positive spirit alive in Winsted

The Winsted Journal Editorial
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No matter how tough the annual budget battles are or how difficult the town’s financial situation gets, the spirit of volunteerism is alive and well in Winsted, as demonstrated by members of the Laurel City Commission and the Winsted Elks Lodge, who hosted this year’s Laurel Tea April 3.

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Nuclear March Madness

In The Public Interest

President Obama’s pick of Kansas to win the March Madness collegiate basketball tournament ended with their defeat by Virginia Commonwealth University this past Saturday. He must know how the Jay Hawks are feeling because he is entangled in his own March Madness that will continue after this month ends.

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News from previous decades

Historic Bytes

It’s time once again to have a look back in time and realize just how fast it slips away from us.
10 years ago — 2001: We were already into our new century and had experienced our first national election, which saw George W. Bush sworn in as our 43rd president; our fifth-grade students at the Colebrook Consolidated School were being born; Colebrook was building a new firehouse in the Forge District; and George Wilbur ceased producing milk from his once large herd of Brown Swiss cows, ending the era of small farms in what since Colonial times had been the backbone of our economy.

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President Obama’s imperial adventure

The Sheldon Richman Column

President Obama’s entry into Libya’s civil war can be criticized on many levels: The mission as explained is incoherent; Congress was not asked for a declaration of war as the Constitution requires; events in Libya do not affect the security of the American people; bombing another oil-rich Muslim country aggravates the conditions that create anti-American terrorism; killing innocent civilians is nearly inevitable; the rebels’ motives are unclear; mission creep happens; war unleashes unforeseen, uncontrollable forces; the government is already deep in debt, and more.

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Statewide volunteerism

Guest Commentary

Former state Rep. Deborah Heinrich is the new nonprofit liaison to the governor, a position created this year to advocate for nonprofit agencies. Gov. Dannel Malloy, in creating the new position, noted that he would look for sacrifice from everyone but would not cut the safety net of services provided by the nonprofit community.
On Monday, March 14, the CPO Council of the Connecticut United Way went to Hartford to meet with Ms. Heinrich to talk about how she sees her new role and how the United Way can help be a part of the solution.

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Voice your frustrations next Thursday at Gilbert

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Winchester residents should mark their calendars for an important special town meeting next Thursday, April 7, at The Gilbert School. Voters are invited to speak about the Winchester Board of Selectmen’s recent decision to reject approximately $400,000 in free money for the town, courtesy of a deal organized by the Winchester Land Trust.

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Nuclear energy is not cheap, clean or safe

The Civic Beat

The president is promoting federal loan guarantees to build two new nuclear power plants at a cost of $8.3 billion. Over the last decade, the nuclear industry has spent more than $600 million lobbying the federal government and another $63 million in federal campaign contributions. To advance its cause, the nuclear industry is taking a new tack: the need for jobs and concerns about global warming.

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Japan reminds us a nuclear nightmare may be looming

In The Public Interest

The unfolding multiple nuclear reactor catastrophe in Japan is prompting overdue attention to the 104 nuclear plants in the United States — many of them aging, many of them near earthquake faults, some on the West Coast exposed to potential tsunamis.
Nuclear power plants boil water to produce steam to turn turbines that generate electricity. Nuclear power’s overly complex fuel cycle begins with uranium mines and ends with deadly radioactive wastes for which there still are no permanent storage facilities to contain them for tens of thousands of years.

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Proposed FOI consolidation raises a red flag

The Winsted Journal Editorial

While newly elected Gov. Dannel Malloy has shown no desire to be secretive in his work running the state’s business, a troublesome component of his economic plan is raising red flags in local newsrooms, as it proposes merging the state’s Freedom of Information Commission (FOIC) with four other agencies to form a new Office of Government Accountability (OGA).

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PBS and NPR are leaning right

In The Public Interest

The tumultuous managerial shake-up at National Public Radio headquarters for trivial verbal miscues once again has highlighted the ludicrous corporatist right-wing charge that public radio and public TV are replete with left-leaning or leftist programming.
Ludicrous, that is, unless this criticism’s yardstick is the propaganda regularly exuded by the extreme right-wing Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity. These “capitalists” use the public’s airwaves free of charge to make big money.

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