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The Winsted Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Time to topple corporate dictators

In The Public Interest

The 18-day, non-violent Egyptian protests for freedom raise a question: Is America next?
Were Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Paine around, they would likely say, “What are we waiting for?” They would be appalled by the concentration of economic and political power in such a few hands. Remember how often these two men warned about concentrated power.   

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When will George W. Bush be tried for his war crimes?

The Sheldon Richman Column

We should take a small measure of satisfaction in former President George W. Bush’s cancellation of his trip to Switzerland after human-rights groups threatened to bring legal action against him for authorizing torture.
Persons detained by the U.S. government after 9/11 were subjected to what the Bush administration euphemistically called “enhanced interrogation,” including waterboarding. In reality those methods constituted torture, violating U.S. law and international agreements.

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Memoirs of Colebrook River, Part VI

Historic Bytes

Helen Seymour’s story continues:
“Grandfather loved to tell this story about Mr. George Ives and the teapot.
“One day a woman came into Mr. Ives’ General Store wanting to purchase a teapot. The teapots were hanging on hooks on the top row of shelves. Mr. Ives would slide one off the hook with a long stick and catch it as it fell.

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Civic institutions essential for Egypt’s Revolution

In The Public Interest

Colman McCarthy, a former Washington Post writer and founder of the Center for Teaching Peace, must be very happy with the news from Egypt. For 25 years, McCarthy has been persuading high schools and colleges to adopt peace studies in their curriculum (for more information, contact him at cmccarthy@starpower.net). Now he has another example of a largely non-violent revolution — led by young people of all backgrounds — successfully ousting a dictatorial regime.

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Memoirs of Colebrook River, V

Historic Bytes

Helen Seymour’s recollections of life in Colebrook River in the early years of the 20th century continue.
“The year Doris was born [1907] we spent the Fourth of July at home, as Mother felt the long drive to Winsted in the heat would be too much for a 3-month-old baby. We had been shooting off our firecrackers and caps that morning when mother called me to help her.

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Critics attack governor prematurely over budget

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s first budget had not yet seen the light of day this week before political opponents began attacking the governor for raising taxes on Connecticut citizens. As details of the budget were leaked this week, political opponents of the state’s first Democratic governor in two decades claimed tax increases will result in the departure of wealthy citizens and corporations, who will pack up and leave the Nutmeg State to find lower tax rates.

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A nation is born: dispatch from the Southern Sudan

Guest Commentary

It’s not often that a new nation is founded as the result of a well-supported, peaceful and legal vote. Rarer still is having such an outcome after a protracted civil war.

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The eternal Drug War

Body Politic

The Afghanistan War seems interminable. It is the longest hot war in U.S. history. Europe’s Hundred Years War remains the world record holder, but things moved slower back then. Pentagon officials appear to dream of setting a new record in Kabul.
Meanwhile, our War on Drugs is quietly building its own longevity record. This war dates back to the Nixon administration and shows little sign of abating.

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Winsted selectmen say ‘no’ to something for nothing

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Any signs that the Winsted’s elected officials are working together for the betterment of the town went out the window Monday night when the Board of Selectmen rejected a simple plan to bring nearly $400,000 to the town, in exchange for essentially nothing.

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Time for democracy in Egypt

In The Public Interest

Those politically savvy people who thought strongman Hosni Mubarak would be out before the end of the first week of the Egyptian uprising better rethink the odds. For 30 years Mubarak has developed what can be called a deeply rooted dictatorial regime with regular White House access and annual largesse of some $1.3 billion in military equipment and payroll.

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