Login

The Winsted Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Finito la comedia

Anyone who has a slight appreciation toward circus, vaudeville or slapstick should have loved Trump. I did. From the moment he announced his intention to run as the president of the United States of America, shall we say, he was sort of enjoyable? 

There was something nutty about his behavior, that he appeared to be a gold mine for satirists searching for fresh material. Oh, just watching his expressions was priceless, the way he moved his mouth sideways, the way he rolled his eyes and the way he pulled his hair back. Oh, yes, the hair. 

Malloy still has strength and time to slow state’s long fall

Announcing so far ahead of the next election that he will not seek a third term, Governor Malloy risks losing influence with the General Assembly, which has only begun the first of its two sessions remaining during his term. 

But even as a “lame duck” the governor can preserve his influence if he is willing to use or threaten to use his veto more aggressively. And by forswearing re-election, he has given himself more freedom to do things that strike him as impolitic but right or necessary.

Wide open race for dubious prize: governor

It’s probably just a coincidence that Dan Malloy announced he would not seek reelection the day after a national survey determined he had the third-worst approval rating of all 50 governors and was the least popular Democratic governor in the United States.

The governor said his low approval rating wasn’t a factor and that he had never been afraid of taking unpopular stands, and we’ll take him at his word. 

Fine Print

Connecticut has real income tax, fake spending cap

This summer, Connecticut will celebrate — or maybe “observe” is the better verb — the 25th anniversary of the state income tax.

And in November, we’ll be marking the 24th anniversary of the amendment to the state Constitution that was designed to make everyone feel better about the income tax — the state spending cap.

The income tax was real, but the spending cap turned out to be a fake.

The savings and stability of public banking

As a society obsessed with money, we pay a gigantic price for not educating high school and college students about money and banking. 

The ways of the giant global banks — both commercial and investment operations — are as mysterious as they are damaging to the people. Big banks use the Federal Reserve to maximize their influence and profits. 

P&Z was right to deny health center application

After two meetings and several hours of presentations and residents’ comments during two public hearings, the Planning and Zoning Commission decided against granting a special use permit application to convert the Winsted Super Saver IGA, located at 372 Main St., into a medical clinic for Community Health and Wellness of Greater Torrington.

It was a very tough decision for the commission, filled with emotion on all sides, with many residents sad to see grocery store owner John Dwan announce his eventual retirement and closing of the grocery store.

Connecticut has a real income tax, but a fake spending cap

This summer, Connecticut will celebrate — or maybe “observe” is the better verb — the 25th anniversary of the state income tax.

And in November, we’ll be marking the 24th anniversary of the amendment to the state Constitution that was designed to make everyone feel better about the income tax — the state spending cap.

The income tax was real, but the spending cap turned out to be a fake.

Town is right to take its time investigating Lambert Kay bid

The long saga of the former Lambert Kay building, which started 15 years ago when residents at a town meeting approved its purchase of the building for $1, continues on into 2017.

The next chapter in the saga comes in the form of a bid submitted in early March for the building by Parker Benjamin Real Estate Services in Unionville.