Login

Theater

Take A Road Trip To Chatham For This Fun Mac-Haydn Musical

Theater: ‘Dirty Rotten Scoundrels’

There are at least six good reasons to put the Mac-Haydn Theatre’s “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” on your must-see list.
The performances of Gabe Belyeu, Madison Stratton, Colin Pritchard, Judith Wyatt, Kelly Gabrielle Murphy and Steve Hassmer work together like a finely tuned orchestra to present an engaging, lively, funny and high-energy evening of music and dance.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Playhouse Prepares For Adventurous June 9 Opener

Theater: ‘Minor Character’

Once you get it, it’s fine. Even fascinating. The Sharon Playhouse, known for producing musicals, crowding the stage with children and striving ever for the familiar, is opening its season on June 9 with “Minor Character,” described as “six translations of ‘Uncle Vanya’ at the same time.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Young Actors Shine On Rhinebeck Stage

Theater: ‘Oliver!’

Both “Oliver Twist,” the Charles Dickens novel, and “Oliver!” the musical by Lionel Bart, are lurid and enduring. It’s a cruel world, after all. Violence is visited upon children and women; there’s unceasing poverty, hunger and danger; and the class system is impenetrable — unless, of course you are the grandson of an aristocrat.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Joyous Art Exhibit Honors Hotchkiss School’s Legacy

Art: ‘Becoming: 30 Hotchkiss Artists’

I laughed out loud reading Leslie Horn’s online piece, “A Completely Attainable Guide To Getting Rich and Following Your Dreams.” It’s about a sculptor, John Mosler, who went to The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, then Princeton, prospered mightily in the derivatives market and gave it all up to work in a fabulously renovated Brooklyn warehouse, now sculpting for a living and getting attention in arts magazines and newspapers like The New York Times.
First, Horn cheekily advises in her guide, be born rich. Mosler was. Mosler Safes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The Mac’s Season Opens In Style

Theater: ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

You likely know the storyline of “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” Boy gets coat, boy loses coat and ends up in an Egyptian prison, Pharaoh has a bad dream, chaos ensues, boy gets new coat.
So, should you choose to visit the Mac-Haydn Theatre for a two-hour high-energy production, you likely won’t be shocked by the way things unfold. Be assured, however, it’s not the storyline that will draw you into the venue’s 49th season opener, it’s the great cast and the stellar production.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

This Play Is A Clever History Lesson In The Courtroom

Theater: ‘Kunstler’

First come jokes: “What do you call a lawyer with an IQ of 70? Your honor!”
Then the apologia for a legal career defending society’s outsiders.
We are watching and listening to the flamboyant William Kunstler (Jeff McCarthy), a courtroom showman with flowing hair, glasses perched on his head, rumpled clothes and the persona of a great character actor, as he tells us about his most famous cases. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

This Farce Is Sure To Make You Laugh

Theater: ‘Rumors’

‘He’s bleeding all over the room!” Ken Gorman shouts down the stairs to his wife, Chris. “I don’t know why people decorate in white.”
This joke immediately sets the tone for “Rumors,” a farcical play by Neil Simon. The fast-paced script is full of clever lines to keep cast members on their toes. Luckily, the performers of this local production have great comedic timing.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Destruction Rules In Entertaining Play

Theater: ‘True West’

Brothers. Two of them. One, Austin, has an Ivy league education, a career writing movie scripts and a wife; the other, Lee, has a filthy T-shirt, a belly, a life of petty crime and a can of Pabst Blue Ribbon. Why ever would there be trouble ahead?
Well, there’s jealousy, between them, irritation, anger and regret. 
But everyone has sorrows in “True West,” an entertaining play that is running at the Ghent Playhouse.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The Perfect Venue for ‘Follies’

Theater: 'Follies'

The orchestra plays, the lights come up and a bevy of elegant ladies begins descending the stairs. But these women aren’t lovely young chorus girls. They are aging, watching each step carefully. Some clutch at the rail, some are off the beat, but they still know how to show off their star quality. They wear frumpy gowns and banners emblazoned with the year they were a Follies girl — 1940, 1930, 1918. Now it’s 1971, and the theater is about to be torn down for a parking lot.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Humanity For Animals

Theater: ‘Animal Farm’

The cast of “Animal Farm” has pulled off an impressive feat on the intimate stage at TheatreWorks New Milford. 
Since the production features minimal props, simple costumes that look like long thermal underwear (there are no fuzzy animal suits in sight) and only a few well-placed pieces of music, the play hinges on the performers to bring George Orwell’s 1945 novella to life. For the 90-minute run time, the cast members shine as they give humanity to these animals.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.