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Theater

Divas, Divas, Divas (And Four Guys)

TriArts opens the season with music director Michael Berkeley’s “Divas Do the Decades.” Rockette and choreographer Amber Cameron (third from left) will perform with 39 more female dancer/singers and four guys. Shows run at TriArts’ Sharon Playhouse June 8 and 9 at 8 p.m., and June 10 at 5 p.m. For tickets, call 860-364-7469, ext. 100, or go to www.triarts.net.

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Coming to a Theater Near You

. . . And a Look at What Lies Ahead at BIFF

Now that The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY, has gone digital, local filmgoers have been able to see broadcasts of the Metropolitan Opera and the National Theatre in London. Coming next week is a rebroadcast of the NT Live’s most successful and popular production, “Frankenstein.”

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Oh, Take Me Back to 1985

Theater: ‘The Wedding Singer’
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

Sadly, time-traveling DeLoreans don’t really exist (yet, anyway). So if you want to see the “Thriller” dance, cell phones the size of bricks and parachute pants this weekend, your best bet is “The Wedding Singer” at the Center for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck.
If the title sounds familiar, that’s because this comedic musical is based on the film starring Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore.

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Oil in Troubled Waters

The Theater Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

You have had them. Those mornings when you wake up and remember the previous evening, hoping it was only a dream. Then your head clears, you reach for your scribbled notes, and it all comes back: Yes, it was really that bad.
I had one of those mornings last Sunday, after spending an interminable Saturday evening with “The Madwoman of Chaillot” at the Ghent Playhouse. The anticipation I felt entering the theater — after all, my sainted mother loved this poetic farce — quickly yielded to glum resignation. But unlike half the audience, I couldn’t leave after the first act.

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Theaters Revive Some Venerable Hits

Theater Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

For these pious Russian Jews at the turn of the 20th century, it’s a narrow world of poverty, grinding labor and religious custom. God hovers. Marriages are arranged. Men are educated, some of them, women, not so much — and everyone in the shtetl lives in fear of expulsion. Pogroms in Eastern Europe have scattered Jews all over the globe.
“May God bless and keep the czar . . . far away from us,” the Rabbi prays.
It was not to be, of course.
We already know that.

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Theater Life, After School

Starting Out on Stage
compass@lakevillejournal.com

To the music, “Step, step, slide, kick,” teacher chants as her dozen students passé and pivot to a recording of “Dance With Me Tonight,” a bouncy little bass-heavy number recorded by Olly Murs.
This is a special Saturday morning dance workshop run by Kristin Altfather, a Rockette invited by the Warner Center for Arts Education in Torrington to give these youngsters a taste of the professional dancing life.

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A Fishing Story, Kinda

Theater: ‘Zara Spook and Other Lures’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Yes. Zara Spook is a lure, for catching bass. It’s plump and white, and it skitters, drawing fish to the surface, just the way love and fame and a thirst for revenge do in Joan Ackermann’s “Zara Spook and Other Lures.”
It’s also about women competing in the great Bass Classic in Truth or Consequences, NM. Really.
Ackermann’s people are peculiar and dear, even Mel (Thom Whaley) who unleashes his shotgun repeatedly at Ramona (Ariel Bock), his wife and a champion angler on her way to New Mexico.

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You Musn’t Go Home Again

Theater: ‘The Subject Was Roses’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Alone in the living room, John Cleary tries on his son’s Army jacket. It’s tight, and he takes it off before anyone can see, anyone being his wife, Nettie, and their boy, Timmy.
That’s how Frank Gilroy opens his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, “The Subject Was Roses” about a wildly troubled middle-class family in the Bronx.
It’s the 1940s and young men are returning from war. Timmy (Matthew Bagley) is one of them, but he is not heading into peace and security. The Cleary household is another kind of war zone. The soul-killing kind.

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Asking for Trouble

Theater: ‘A Man for All Seasons’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Ah! Americans love British drama about class, intrigue and, when possible, royalty. Take, say, “My Fair Lady,” “Downton Abbey,” or, even better, “A Man for All Seasons,” this last drawing good-sized audiences to Rhinebeck’s Performing Arts Center.
This Centerstage Production has it all: beginning with an incorruptable polititian in Sir Thomas More, the king’s chancellor, who insists that the rule of law must be defended, no matter the cost.

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A Bad Time For the Truth

Theater: ‘Pack of Lies’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

The title says it all: In Hugh Whitemore’s “Pack of Lies,” everyone has reason to skirt the truth. Not sensible reasons, nor lofty reasons nor even pernicious reasons. But lies lead the way because truth is hard.
This Cold-War tale, set in 1961 and written a couple of decades later, involves spies who do not own up to the role, and patriots who cannot take on their role without destroying friends.

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