Login

Theater

Recalling Old Sorrows, And Overcoming Them,

Theater: ‘Shakespeare for My Father’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Lynn Redgrave was barely noticed by Sir Michael Redgrave. The actor. Her father.
In “Shakespeare for My Father,” a play Lynn Redgrave wrote about growing up in this illustrious theater family, she searches her father’s journals after his death, particularly the ones from 1943, seeking notice of her birth.
No notice taken.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

An Ambitious Performance Strikes a Modern Chord

Theater: ‘An Inspector Calls’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The Sherman Playhouse, a true community theater of limited means, is ambitious. “Salome,” “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” “Gaslight” and “Enchanted April” have been produced there in the last two years. But without Stephen Daldry, most famous for “Billy Elliott,” I doubt even they would have considered “An Inspector Calls.”
Arguably the most famous of J. B. Priestly’s plays, “Inspector” is a hoary melodrama that Daldry reimagined and stood on its head at London’s National Theatre in 1992.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

FDR and a Harried God

compass@lakevillejournal.com

“The Trial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt” at New Stage Performing Arts in Pittsfield makes interesting history, and interesting theater.
This is a new play by a new playwright, Edward Bernstein. Looking for something to do as a retired lawyer, Bernstein set to work researching the moves of American government leaders as Hitler went to work exterminating Jews in Europe. It is a disturbing tale of political interest and flagging humanity, and Bernstein places most of the action in Heaven as FDR (Fred Thaler) is brought to trial by Arthur Mandel (Jeffrey David Kent).

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Drawing People to the Arts With a Little Something For Everybody

Theater

It was the history of the world in about 66 minutes at PS 21, short for Performance Spaces for the 21st Century. This is a place for chamber music, plays, modern dance, variety shows, movies and, on this particular Saturday before a hurricane, puppets.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Dwelling in Possibility

Theater: ‘The Belle of Amherst’

It’s a small world, Emily Dickinson’s — her father’s house in Amherst and the family’s garden.
“I never had to go anywhere else to find my Paradise,” she tells us. After all, she lives with possibility, poetry, imagination, so we believe her. “Paradise is within,” Dickinson says.
Still, she pains us. We are terribly afraid for her. Hope and disappointment are linked, always.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Seeking Justice . . . Via Theater

Edward Bernstein is an engaging fellow: verbal, appealing, nice.
And a lawyer.
Retired.
He quit work at age 62.
“I wanted to play tennis.”
Fourteen years ago.
“I enjoyed being a lawyer very much. I made money at it, too.”
Enough money to quit Central Park West and settle in Lenox.
“But I retired earlier than I should,” he says. “I need to use my brain.”
So he wrote a play, “The Trial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Theater on the Line

Theater: ‘A Chorus Line’

I must immediately confess that “A Chorus Line” has never been one of my favorite pieces of musical theater. It has always seemed a little narcissistic. If the performers do not breathe life into it, “A Chorus Line” is just a show about show people who tell us all about what it is like to be a show person.
That was not the case, however with “A Chorus Line” at Rhinebeck’s Performing Arts Center that brought these characters and their stories into vivid relief.
The company assembled by Up in One Productions brought deep meaning to what can seem, well, trite.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Of Pique And Revenge And Loss

Theater: 'The Game'
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Betray a monster, wound it, and you have trouble.
Terrible trouble.
It’s the late 18th century, just a few years before revolutionaries will tear France apart. And aristocrats are behaving badly, most particularly the Marquise de Merteuil, widowed, happily, and living for the game. The game of plotting, getting even, destroying. And prevailing. In all things.
Her accomplice in these matters is Vicomte de Valmont, a user, a seducer and a plotter for the fun of it.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

‘The Game’ Returns

compass@lakevillejournal.com

“The Game,” that 18th-century tale of aristocrats’ intrigues and awful revenge, is returning to Barrington Stage Company. “It’s the most asked-for show we’ve ever done,” says Julianne Boyd, BSC’s artistic director.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Playing To Win

Theater: 'Hairspray'
leong@lakevillejournal.com

What could be better tonic in this summer of our national discontent than TriArts’ revival of “Hairspray,” that bouncy, happy musical extolling all-American values: resilience, determination, fair play and victory for the underdog? When chunky Tracy Turnblad bounds about the stage exuding optimism, she’s like a cheerleader for the America we miss.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.