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Theater

Rehearsing TriArts’ ‘42nd Street’

Theater
compass@lakevillejournal.com

“The Red Shoes,” 1948’s gorgeous, technicolor film about ballet, choice and tragedy inspired little girls to strap into toe shoes.
Not any more.
Now it’s the Broadway musical “A Chorus Line” that turns young people on to the power and glory of dancing on a stage.
Among those smitten by that musical about Broadway “gypsies” was Kate Vallee, dancer, Rockette member, teacher and, right now, choreographer for TriArts’ “42nd Street,” opening June 23 at the Sharon Playhouse.

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Irving Berlin & Us

Theater: ‘I Love a Piano’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

We admire Irving Berlin as a patriot, a booster of American style and wit, and as the writer of our most soaring anthem, “God Bless America.”
But the great music and songwriter saw our subversive side too. And we get a whiff of that in TriArts founders Michael Berkeley and Ray Roderick’s “I Love a Piano,” as three couples dance and sing their way through five decades marked by war, economic catastrophe and head-spinning change.

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Play It Again, Ray, At the Mac-Haydn

Theater Notes
compass@lakevillejournal.com

The Shook sisters have been onstage since Kelly was 3 and Karla, 4.
That’s when their mother took them to an audition for “Carousel” at the Mac-Haydn Theatre in Chatham, NY. In the 20 or so years since, they have totally abandoned the idea of making their livelihoods in any other way and have spent so much time performing that neither one can look at a camera without flashing the bright eyes and the big smile.

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Showing It All

Theater: 'The Full Monty'

The word for the Rhinebeck’s Center for Performing Arts production of “The Full Monty” is “rollicking.”

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Of Land, Family and Eternity

Theater
leong@lakevillejournal.com

In Horton Foote’s “The Carpetbagger’s Children,” the decline of a rich East Texas family is told by three sisters in monologues that are both collective and individual. Time shifts, emotions are hidden then revealed, and the family moves inexorably toward its ultimate fate. No wonder Aglet Theatre Company has chosen this surprisingly rich play for its current, staged (no scripts) production.

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The Demon Child

Theater
karaw@lakevillejournal.com

There’s just something so lovable about maniacal children. Especially the sweet, murderous ones like Rhoda Penmark (Campbell Coughlin) in the Sherman Players’ production of Maxwell Anderson’s “The Bad Seed.”
The play first introduces us to Rhoda as a practically-perfect-in-every-way 8-year-old who is neat as a pin, astonishingly polite and overwhelmingly smart.
But alas, this could not last for long.

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Three Women; Three Tales

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Aglet Theatre Company winds up its spring season of staged readings with Horton Foote’s next to last play, “The Carpetbagger’s Children.”
Set in a small Texas town after Reconstruction, three sisters
singly tell family stories, each story skewed slightly by memory, personality and time, each giving their own version of the same tales.
Foote is known for his film scripts “To Kill a Mockingbird,” and “Tender Mercies.” For his play “The Young Man From Atlanta,” Foote won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1995.

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Daring Makes It So

Theater: ‘Fahrenheit 451’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

For such a grim play, Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” (the temperature at which books burn) has a delightful and witty finish with Tolstoy and Aristotle and Dostoevsky and Lewis Carroll and Emily Bronte and others milling about, and shaking hands with each other in some woodsy retreat.
“Call me Ishmael,” Melville says, introducing himself to Poe, a newcomer.
These readers have escaped to “tell and remember books,” to memorize great works, preserving them like Irish monks in a shattered world.

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Raising Big Questions

Theater: ‘Good People’

David Lindsay-Abaire’s “Good People” is about being down and out in Boston and why some people get out of the ghetto, and others do not.
In the opening scene, with some of the best writing in the play, Margie Walsh (Frances McDormand) tries hard to avoid being fired for chronic lateness by her supervisor/friend, Stevie (Patrick Carroll). She bobs and weaves around the complaints (she says she has a daughter who is retarded), all to no avail. Stevie says he has orders to fire her or be out of a job himself.

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Pinter’s Mystery

Theater: ‘The Collection’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

“The Collection” is an early Pinter work. Yet it contains the hallmarks, if less subtley, of later Pinter masterpieces, such as “The Homecoming,” “No Man’s Land” and “Betrayal.” It’s almost a writing exercise, in which the various possibilities of infidelity — in fact and in fancy — are explored geometrically. A wife may, or may not, have been unfaithful with another, probably gay, man. He in turn may, or may not, have been unfaithful to his much older, presumed lover.

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