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I Do Recommend This Musical

Theater: I Do! I Do!’

There were laughs. One would expect so, since the lines in “I Do! I Do!” are still crisp, the acting in the current TheatreWorks New Milford production superb and the subject matter close to the hearts of many in the audience.
And, there were nervous laughs. One would expect so, since “I Do! I Do!” by Tom Jones (book and lyrics) and Harvey Schmidt (music) collapses a 50-year marriage into an evening and, along the way, manages to strike an exposed nerve or two in the audience.

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It’s An Engaging Cast, But The Story Falls Flat

Theater: ‘Dark of the Moon’

It’s not hard to see why Howard Richardson and William Berney’s “Dark of the Moon” would be a favorite of high school and college theater programs. 
The play, written in 1945, is brimming with meaty roles for budding actors: a Puck-ish witch-boy and his witchy henchwomen, a sinning girl, a Baptist preacher and all sorts of local color to evoke backwoods Appalachia, the play’s setting. 
In the new production by the Sherman Players, there’s even a character named “Local Color Banjo Man.”

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Grim And Riveting

Theater: ‘No Exit’

The Aglet Theatre Company is presenting “No Exit,” directed by Thomas Gruenewald, for two performances this Saturday, Oct. 7,  at Dewey Hall in Sheffield, Mass. This is a small play, one act, written in 1944 by Jean Paul Sartre during the German occupation of France.

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It’s A Gorgeous Set For A Delightfully Creepy Tale

Theater: ‘And Then There Were None’

One of Agatha Christie’s most acclaimed mysteries, “And Then There Were None,” features a nursery rhyme in which the demise of 10 people is plotted. It is represented quite elegantly as chess pieces above the stage of the Warner Theatre’s Nancy Marine Studio Theatre in Torrington.

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Shallow? Sure, But It’s Full Of Laughs

Theater: ‘God of Carnage’

There is something cathartic about watching other people’s marriages and relationships blow up. And when they are pulled apart by French playwright Yasmina Reza, the result is deliciously funny.

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Connecting Horses With Veterans

Theater: ‘Cry Havoc’

‘There is no manual for coming back.” Writer, actor and director Stephan Wolfert is quite firm in his position. “As veterans, we have been taught to dehumanize our enemies … to distance ourselves. We need to find the ways to become grounded, again — to connect. It can be theater, it can be with equine therapy like The Equus Effect, but we need to find our humanity.”

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It’s As Good As Broadway

Theater: ‘Hello, Dolly!’

Can’t see Bette Midler’s “Hello, Dolly!” on Broadway? Then hurry to the Mac-Haydn Theatre in Chatham, N.Y., before its delightful, inventive production of “Dolly” ends Sept. 3. In some ways, its more interesting than the bombastic, garish Broadway show. (Sorry Ms. Midler and David Hyde Pierce. You’re both terrific.)

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The Bard Comes To Winsted

Theater: ‘Secret Shakespeare’

The Whiting Mills artist studio building in Winsted was transformed into stages for a unique theatrical production called “Secret Shakespeare” on Aug. 25 and 26.
The event was presented by the Desultory Theatre Club and the Northwest Connecticut Arts Council, and it featured performances by members of multiple Connecticut theater companies: The Backyard Theater Ensemble of Cheshire, puppeteers from Elmwood Productions in Bristol, Sova Dance and Puppet Theater in Ridgefield, The Shipwreck Theatre Company of Guilford and the Desultory Theatre Club.

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The Light Is Not Dark Enough

Theater: ‘The Tempest’

This show in the round and out of doors begins at 5:30 in the afternoon. It’s daylight. And daylight dilutes drama as water weakens whiskey. Though it’s charming to see flocks of black birds skim the sky, darkness makes magic. And magic is what “The Tempest” is about. 

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The Story Of Mrs. Fitzgerald

Theater: ‘The Last Flapper’

It’s not easy to be rebellious, sexy, daring, ambitious, female and youthful all at once. It was especially not easy in the South at the start of the 20th century. But there she was, the adolescent Zelda Sayre, bobbing her hair, drinking, running out at night, teasing boys, relishing impropriety and wild to leave Montgomery, Ala.
F. Scott Fitzgerald gave her a way out, and, she hoped, a way up.

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