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Hidden Treasures

Millerton’s Warriors of Winter helped keep streets clean

MILLERTON — As winters go, 2018-19 so far has been a relatively mild one with snow disappearing almost as soon as it arrived. But there have been times, particularly in the earlier days of the village, when Mother Nature did her worst and humans had to fight back any way they could. 

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Tracking the history of the Millerton clock tower

MILLERTON — Sometimes the greatest Hidden Treasures go unnoticed even though they are in plain sight. That is the case with the symbol of the village of Millerton — the old clock tower atop the Main Street’s Moviehouse, known as Benedict Hall. 
Since its installation in 1903, the clock’s face told the passing moments of each day as its bell tolled the hours — reminding residents of tasks to be done, friends to be met and celebrations to be held. 

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A look back on Terni’s, and its place in the village of Millerton

MILLERTON — Turn the calendar of Millerton back some six or seven decades and take a long look at Terni’s store, where Main Street curves downhill to Route 22. 
There, to hear owner Phil Terni tell it, in the evening hours, after super had been served and dishes cleared away by the women of the house, after lamps had been lit and curtains drawn, veterans of “The Big One — WWII” would gather.  

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