Login

Off the Record

Not in your backyard. How about theirs?

In 1598, when a theater was being built in London for William Shakespeare’s acting troupe, local residents figured theater-goers would disrupt the neighborhood so they blocked construction. The Globe Theater ended up being built across the Thames.

More recently, Falls Village, Goshen and Salisbury have all rejected affordable housing in areas that residents deemed too sensitive, too idyllic or too inappropriate for such use. New sites will have to be acquired or the projects cancelled.

The real threat to democracy on the Fourth of July

During World War II, the author and essayist E. B. White was asked by the Writers’ War Board for a statement on “The Meaning of Democracy.”

As you’d expect from the writer who made “The Elements of Style” a beloved guide to clear, concise English for generations of students, White’s response was memorable and succinct.

“Surely the board knows what Democracy is,” he began his reply in The New Yorker for July 3, 1943:

Some Democrats, Trump agree on border

While Democrats continue to focus on undoing the last election, an obsession that may only ensure President Trump’s reelection, the southern border continues to fall apart.

Things have gotten so bad at the border that it’s no longer just Trump saying it’s an emergency. Even The New York Times agrees with him. The paper of record has been running front page stories detailing how badly the border is being overrun, with unsustainable strain on manpower and resources.

Why didn’t President John Kennedy put women in outer space decades ago?

The first all-female space walk was cancelled last week because NASA didn’t have space suits of the right size for both female astronauts. Most NASA suits are designed for men, who are larger. So the walk was changed to one woman and one man.

Predictably, this raised a cry about female victimhood in a male-dominated world. So a little background is in order.

Everybody’s hat is in the ring, including mine

Of the several thousand people expected to run for the Democratic presidential nomination, two of the early entrants are senators Kamala Harris of California and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.

Harris says she’s running out of a “sense of duty” and “love of country.” Gillibrand styles herself as a “young mom” who will “fight for your children” as hard as she would fight for her own.

We are all descended from someone, of course

As Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) launches her presidential bid, she’s scrambling to repair the damage caused by her decades-long claim of native ancestry. Liberal media is helping her by putting favorable spin on the story or ignoring it altogether.

We are all descended from some ancestors, but which ones?

As Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) launches her presidential bid, she’s scrambling to repair the damage caused by her decades-long claim of native ancestry. Liberal media is helping her by putting favorable spin on the story or ignoring it altogether.

Some things improve in afterlife

Reading the press accolades for the late President George H.W. Bush, it was difficult to reconcile today’s “revered statesman” with the “wimp” label the media pinned on him in office.

As vice president and then president in the 1980s and early 1990s, Bush was portrayed by the press as an out-of-touch bumbler, a national joke on late-night TV and in newsrooms. White House correspondents delighted in catching Bush in gaffes and in pointing out what, in their liberal view, were his wrong-headed policy positions, which was just about all of them.

Post election aftermath of the U.S. Senate hearing

If the left was energized in the midterms by hatred of President Trump, the right was motivated by rage at what Democrats did to Brett Kavanaugh. The former helped Democrats take the House. The latter helped Republicans keep the Senate.

The Ford-Kavanaugh Senate hearing was always about politics and the direction of the Supreme Court for the next generation. But it was also about the rule of law. Who were you going to believe in the absence of proof? And how would that dynamic play out in future cases?

Fair and balanced, or not at all?

Brett Kavanaugh was as calm as could be expected at the Senate hearing Sept. 27, for someone who has been publicly accused and convicted without proof of assault, rape and exposure.

The people who have been truly hysterical throughout all this are not Kavanaugh or Christine Ford, but the media, especially The New York Times. Their parsing of Kavanaugh’s high school yearbook in a desperate search for evidence of bad character takes investigative journalism to a new low.