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Yes, Miniature Marshmallows

Holiday Food: This fruit salad was a favorite in Leon Graham’s childhood home in Texas. Readers are encouraged to send us their family recipes. Call me at 860-435-9873 x 111 or email me at compass@lakevillejournal.com.
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Both my mother and her mother made this 24-hour fruit salad at Christmas, as did thousands of other Texas cooks. The recipe made a lot, so my mother used one of the vegetable bins in the refrigerator for its day-long rest. What went in as a fairly loose mixture came out light, fluffy and, to me, delicious. My brother, the difficult second child, swears he never tasted it because he hated pecans.
After my mother died, when I was in my mid-20s, my brother’s wife began making her mother’s fruit salad. (But her husband wouldn’t eat it either.) I confess I still like both.

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Holiday Food

This is the first in a series of stories about family holiday dishes. This one, from Leon Graham’s mother was a favorite at Christmas parties in Texas when Graham was just a lad. Readers are invited to send us their holiday recipes. Just call Marsden Epworth at 860-435-9873 ext 111, or send recipes to Compass@lakevillejournal.com.Don’t forget to include a phone number.
compass@lakevillejournal.com

From the 1950s
A Texas Treat
 

Some will find my mother's “snow cap spread” peculiar. Others will like its velvety texture and piquant flavor. But it was a cocktail and holiday party staple in Texas as I was growing up. Mounded into a compact, rounded hemisphere on a festive plate; frosted with cream cheese, sour cream and hot mustard; decorated with a sprig of glossy holly (which came from the florist, not Texas gardens), it reminded us of what we never had for the holidays: snow.
 

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Linney Coaching Young Actors, Aiding Salisbury Family Services

In Alaska, a decade ago, multi-award-winning actor Laura Linney discovered teaching. Invited to a playwriting program that included her father, Romulus Linney, who died last year, she was asked to give participants pointers on stage technique.
And she was hooked.
So Linney started contacting schools with theater programs wherever she was — usually colleges and universities, but often secondary schools, too — offering to help students.
“I’ll meet with them, talk to groups, coach scenes, meet with faculty. I’ll do whatever they ask that I have time to do.

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Like No Show You Have Ever Seen

Excursions: Leon Graham Goes to The Met
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Alexander McQueen, the iconic and complex fashion designer who hanged himself last year at age 40, created extreme clothes for his runway shows: a silky dress with antlers protruding from its shoulders, a skirt made of leather strips laid over a flaring armature, a gorgeous kimono holding the arms in a straightjacket embrace. Dresses were made from feathers, flowers, oyster shells, thin wood, paper. But always there was drama, shock and theatricality.

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A Grand Passion . . . For Gardening

Gardens
tarak@lakevillejournal.com

High on a hill off White Hollow Road in Sharon, Lee Link, gardener, world traveler and spirited hostess, has made a garden that merges with the woodland on one side of her house and sets boundaries, on the other.
She has transformed a challenging site.
The property was long, narrow, steeply sloped, backed by rock ledge and confined by hedgerows when she and her husband, Fritz, bought it nearly 30 years ago.

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Making a Movie, In Salisbury

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Harry Bainbridge makes movies. He made one at Hotchkiss
about a cardboard boat race. He made another about discrimination. And now, with a little help from friends and neighbors, he will be making a movie titled “Michael.”
The plot is based, in part, on his own life and is set at Indian Mountain School where he was a student.
A few months before he was born, Bainbridge’s father died aboard Pan Am flight 103, which was exploded by a terrorist bomb over Lockerbie, Scotland, Dec. 21, 1988. The 9/11 attack, when he was 12 at IMS, was a very disturbing event for him.

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Cafe Giulia Opens, Again

Food: Cafe Giulia
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Robert Willis is a restless fellow with blue eyes, breezy manners and a knack for reinventing himself.
He has been an architect, a photographer, a racer at Lime Rock and a chef. (Yes. A chef in the kind of New York restaurant where customers pay real money for low lights, sausage made of lobster, a whole course in a single teaspoon and the kind of cosseting few people encounter anywhere else in life.)
The trick is to know science. And love art.
Making food, he says, merges the two.

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Experiment, Shop And Meet People

Farmers Markets
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Nettle tea (Urtica Dioica). “Try it,” Ben Schwartz, a farmer from Wassaic, urges. “It’s good for the blood,” he says. “Lowers your cholesterol. Good for allergies, too.”
Barbara Adelberg of Sharon, one of the many people at the Millerton Farmers Market season opener, Saturday, pours a sample of murky, sea-green liquid into a tiny paper cup.
“Hmmmm,” she says.
I try it too.
“Hmmmmm.”
It tastes green, we decide, and figure the mint tea (Mentha Spicata which “cools and soothes aches and upsets”) is an easier swallow.

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Trade Secrets Gets Us Back Into the Garden

Garden Matters
tarak@lakevillejournal.com

The beauty of visiting the gardens at Old Farm Nursery on Route 112 in Lakeville is that when you are struck by inspiration, as you inevitably will be, you can do something about it.
The nursery, as its name indicates, is on the site of an old farm. But the barns and fields are now in the service of flora rather than fauna. From fully grown trees to little saplings, from conifers to crabapples and for the do-it-yourself gardener or the weekend showplace, Old Farm Nursery most likely has the exact specimen you need or want.

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