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Recreation

Get Out Your iPhone, And Make a Movie

The Berkshire International Film Festival, known as BIFF, and the Beacon Cinema in Pittsfield will take part in the 10×10 Upstreet Arts Festival in downtown Pittsfield, MA, Feb. 14-24.
BIFF and the Beacon Cinema will present the Smartphone Film Festival — a growing part on the festival scene. BIFF is looking for submissions of films shot on the iPhone, iPad and various alternative cinematic apps.
Experimental, action, drama and even music video are some of the genres to be considered. 

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. . . And the Plans to Put What Remains to Good Use

The History Scene
kaylag@millertonnews.com

For generations, people in and around New York’s Dutchess County have watched the Harlem Valley State Hospital, later renamed the Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center, and the Harlem Valley Psychiatric Hospital, fall into disrepair and ruin.
While many people were aware of the hulking facility, few, aside from employees, patients and developers, have ever seen the inside.
Now we can take in its grim and rotted interiors in Avery Danzinger’s photo essay, on view at the White Gallery in Lakeville, CT, through Dec. 2, see story opposite page.

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Look To the Farmer’s Almanac for . . . Entertainment

Country Life

Mother Nature has played a couple of nasty tricks on us — a major snowstorm last October, and just recently, Superstorm Sandy — instead of treats for Halloween. What does she have in store next year?
None of the usual sources of weather information, from the National Weather Service on down to Uncle Jake’s left knee, wants to say much beyond a week in advance.
Except for the almanacs. Selecting one at random — Harris’ Farmer’s Almanac for 2013 — we look to see what we can expect for next Halloween.

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How a District Court Judge Came to Make Jewelry From Pearls, Sea Glass, Buttons and Semiprecious Stones

People: Faith Hochberg

Faith Hochberg leads the way into her Lakeville studio where paints, canvases, works in progress fight for space with a worktable covered with saucers of jewels — semiprecious stones, jet, pottery fragments, art, river and sea glass, pearls, buttons, beads, raffia and gold wire ­­— on the way to becoming necklaces.
Wait. Do I have the right Faith Hochberg? The Harvard-educated attorney? The sharp-eyed parser of facts whose analytic abilities and talent for unraveling complex issues prompted her appointment as a District Court Judge?

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Meet Rosie the Riveter, Rockwell’s Model, That Is

People

She was a pretty 19-year-old girl with a shock of red hair living in Arlington, VT, a small New England town. Her mother ran the first telephone switchboard, there.
Nearby was an artist’s studio.
“That’s how I met Norman Rockwell,” Mary Doyle Keefe, told me, relating how she was chosen as his model for women working in factories all over the country fabricating weapons for the military.

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Little Ninjas, Nearer Than You Know

Country Life

They arrived in the night, in silence. They slipped in when no one was looking and made themselves at home, just like that.
In the morning, the sun rose with that yellow glamour that makes for an achingly beautiful day around here. I wanted chive blossoms for an omelet so I stepped outside, ran down the few steps to the garden and then, “Eek!” I unashamedly yelled into the peace of a country morning as a “thing” ran out from under a wooden step.

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Sounds, Sweet Airs and Games That Give Delight

Faire Time
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

Summer may be drawing to a close, but there’s still plenty of time to visit the shire and enjoy a mug of mead while watching a jousting tournament. And who knows, you may even bump into Robin Hood or Queen Elizabeth I.
The New York Renaissance Faire has been a favorite of mine for a dozen years.
This is the fair’s 35th anniversary, and I decided to celebrate by driving to Tuxedo, NY, with my fiancée and her cousin to venture into the quaint village tucked away in Sterling Forest.

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Paula Poundstone on Comedy, NPR’s “Wait Wait” And the Warner

The Show Scene

For starters, there is The Voice: the trumpet-like clarity, throaty laugh and splayed-out Boston vowels, with a steady drip of sardonic delivery. The quick wit and bubbling warmth clinch the deal. This can only be the inimitable comic Paula Poundstone, who performs at the Warner this weekend.

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People Struggling, and Surviving

leong@lakevillejournal.com

When Michael Wellman, a human services professional dealing with the homeless, and composer Roslyn Catracchia met in Honolulu a decade ago, they decided to write “Truly Dually,” a musical about people struggling with the dual problems of mental illness and substance abuse that often lead to homelessness.

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See Lovely Homes and Support HCCC

compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s back, the Housatonic Child Care Center house tour, the chance to see how other people arrange their living room, lay out their garden and order the stuff in their mud room.
“I always love to see other people’s houses,” Hope Mongeau tells me. This former board member of the Housatonic Child Care Center has returned to duty to organize the tour because it’s fun and, she says, the center needs the money. That it does.

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