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Music Celebrating Art

The Music Scene

In a program noting the diversity of Baroque music, cellist, Yehuda Hanani and pianist, Lydia Artymiw will join forces to present Bach, Boccherini, Scarlatti, Vivaldi and a new neo-Baroque commission at the Clark Museum in Williamstown, MA, at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 3.
This performance celebrates the grand reopening of The Clark following its major renovations.
“We are delighted to be part of the expansion and new vision of The Clark,” Hanani tells me.

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At Long Last, Weird Al Did It

The Music Scene

I have been a fan of “Weird Al” Yankovic since 1996’s “Bad Hair Day.” My 13-year-old self couldn’t get enough of this album, which featured “Amish Paradise,” a parody of Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise.”

Of course, I then picked up his other albums and listened to the classics: “Eat It,” “Like a Surgeon,” “Yoda,” and so many others. I even watched his cult film, “UHF.”

That wave of nostalgia came flooding back with the release of “Mandatory Fun,” Yankovic’s 14th — yes, fourteenth — studio album this month. It features five parodies:

Ghosts, Baroque Treasures and Some History

The Music Scene: David Wayne Bailey

In its first American performance since the Metropolitan Opera’s 1914 run, Carl Maria von Weber’s “Euryanthe” opens Friday, as part of Bard’s annual festival Summerscape.

A First Look At BSO’s Andris Nelsons

The Music Scene

It is the day many Tanglewood patrons have anticipated, the arrival of the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s youthful and talented Latvian-born conductor, Andris Nelsons. You may recall that last season, due to a nasty bump on the head, the maestro was prevented from flying from Europe to join the BSO at Tanglewood. Well, the wait is over. Nelsons is here, and I got to see him at last Saturday’s rehearsal.
His brisk walk and forward-leaning posture made clear he is fine and ready.

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Music From a Time of Change and Conflict

The Music Scene

Music from a turbulent 17th-century England was in the air Saturday evening as Aston Magna performed at Simon’s Rock in the Daniels Art Center in Great Barrington, MA.
Daniel Stepner, artistic director and baroque violinist,was joined by Deborah Rentz-Moore (mezzo-soprano), David Ripley (baritone), Danielle Maddon (baroque violin), Laura Jeppesen (viola da gamba), Catherine Liddell (lute and theorbo) and Peter Sykes (organ).

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10 years of growth and honors for Crescendo

The Music Scene
publisher@lakevillejournal.com

When its artistic director, Christine Gevert of Lakeville, began the choral group Crescendo 10 years ago, she couldn’t have known all the ways in which it would grow and change over the next decade.
Then new to the Northwest Corner, and new to the country, she didn’t know if she would find the support and trust such a communal effort requires for success.
“You begin with an idea, a vision, that could somehow become a chorus,” she said in a recent phone interview. “And the vision doesn’t change, but the experience keeps changing every time, making the effort all the more fascinating.”

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Music Mountain Opens Season With The Emerson Quartet

The Music Scene

The Emerson String Quartet, in its first visit here, opened Music Mountain’s summer season performing Haydn, Mendelssohn and Schubert.
These players — violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer; violist Lawrence Dutton; and cellist Paul Watkins — exhibit extraordinary musicianship, which means, in performance, they become one. One with the music and one with each other.

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At Music Mountain

Composer, conductor, double-bass player and teacher Peter Askim returns to Music Mountain for a second year with a group of young and gifted string players. They will perform with ETHEL, a groundbreaking string quartet, music by Shostakovich, Phil Kline, Peter Askim and Theodore Wiprud.
Renamed The Next Festival of Emerging Artists, this week-long program aims to give young professonals a break from the everyday to study, play new music and work out new ideas.

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After Surviving War, A Depression, Music Mountain Thrives

The Music Scene

Nicholas Gordon is a story teller. Yes, he is the president of Music Mountain’s Board, and he is the festival’s musical director, too — more on that shortly — but above all, this man knows how to spin a tale, such as one about his father, Jacques Gordon: violinist, child prodigy, teacher, soloist, concert master of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra by age 21 and founder and first violinist of the Gordon String Quartet.

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The Beach Boys, 10,000 Maniacs, Even Ani DiFranco

Near Home

One of the perks of living in the Tri-state region is the vast number of music venues at hand. Sure, we’re only a quick train
ride to New York City, but I’m talking about the establishments that can
be found in our backyard. Regardless of your musical taste, you can attend
a great concert almost any night of the week.
This frigid spring still feels a bit too much like winter, but we can all
pretend it’s summer thanks to two Beach Boys concerts next week. This
classic American rock band should be familiar to listeners of all ages — I

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