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Music

A Cabaret and A Lesson

The Music Scene

This weekend brings a novel entertainment in the form of a benefit concert for Crescendo, the choral and instrumental ensemble specializing in early and contemporary music. The Secret Life of Opera Singers is a humorous, musical behind-the-scenes look at an aspiring opera singer, performed by up-and-coming professional contralto and comedienne Imelda Franklin Bogue, accompanied by Anne Voglewede Green.
Billed as cabaret, the performance introduces listeners to classic opera repertoire by composers such as Bizet, Verdi, and Rossini.

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Blockbusters Come to Bard

The Music Scene

Felix Mendelssohn composed his great oratorio, “Elijah,” just a year before his death in 1847. It is one of his most enduring works.
Suffused with the Romantic style of his generation, which Mendelssohn helped to define, it also looks back to the oratorios of a previous era, the Baroque. It was Mendelssohn who is largely credited with bringing the masters of the Baroque, particularly Bach, to public attention.

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This Singer Writes More Than Songs

Suzzy Roche is best known as the youngest member of the three-sister band, The Roches. As a solo performer she is known for her funny, wistful and highly literate songs chronicling single motherhood, life in Greenwich Village and the oddities of the music industry.
Now she she has written her first novel, “Wayward Saints.” It is a rollicking, often raunchy, tale of a rock musician, Mary Saint, performing in a high school auditorium in her fictional home town of Swallow, NY.

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Bringing the Baroque to Life

leong@lakevillejournal.com

Suzzy Roche is best known as the youngest of the three-sister band, The Roches, whose debut album was named Album of the Year by The New York Times. As a solo performer she is known for her funny, wistful and highly literate songs chronicling single motherhood, life in Greenwich Village and the oddities of the music industry.
Now you can add author to the list of titles, or superlatives, that go with the name Suzzy Roche. Her first novel, “Wayward Saints,” has just been published by Hyperion.

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Ring in the New

The Music Scene

The talk of the musical week was all about iPhone-gate, the symphonic fiasco that occurred when an audience member’s iPhone marimba ringtone went off in the hushed closing measures of Mahler’s ninth symphony during a New York Philharmonic concert. Conductor Alan Gilbert abruptly halted the piece and turned in the direction of the offending noise. A long and embarrassing stare-down ensued, and, amidst jeers and angry shouts from the audience, the telephoner reached into his pocket and turned off the device.

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Baroque Next to Blues

The Music Scene

For more than a year, St. John’s Church in Salisbury has been hosting a series of free concerts performed by the New Baroque Soloists, under the auspices of the Northwest Music Association. The concerts have been well-received, well-attended and a real pleasure for music lovers in the community.

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Out of Silence

The Music Scene

Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton have been making silent movie music for more than 30 years. “It’s a labor of love,” says Sosin, who was the previous “Music Scene” columnist for Compass. “We have a kind of mission to show audiences how much is gorgeous, emotionally powerful and visually stunning in these [silent] films.” Through their music, Sosin and Seaton interpret the film, they say, in a way that is appropriate to its period and style.

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Music Makes The Season

The Music Scene

Could it really be the penultimate week of 2011?
It seems so. And now, as we celebrate the winter holidays, music takes center stage, perhaps more than at any other time of year.
It is interesting to contemplate what makes this so.
Most obviously, music has always been central to religion, ritual and spirituality. Music gives us Christmas oratorios and carols, spirituals and the Jewish cantorial tradition. For centuries of Western history, sacred music was the dominant form. In non-Western cultures, as well, music accompanies rituals and worship.

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A Varied And Thrilling Music Scene

The Music Scene

After the carols and Messiahs have faded, the ball has dropped, and the New Year’s revelers are recovering, Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Steve Earle will put in an appearance at Club Helsinki Hudson, NY.

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Smooth Sounds of the Season

The Music Scene

The renowned jazz fusion band Spyro Gyra brings its indelible and timeless brand of “adult contemporary” music to the Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center in Great Barrington for a pre-Christmas concert.
The group got its start more than 35 years ago in Buffalo, NY, still its home base, as simply “Tuesday Night Jazz Jams,” and has made nearly 30 original albums since, including one platinum and two gold, plus several “best of” compilations. Their most recent CD, released just this year, is A Foreign Affair, a blend of the band’s signature smooth sound with Latin rhythms.

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