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Music

Bringing the World to Us

It looks like the hottest ticket in the Tri-corner region is for West African superstar Angelique Kidjo at the Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA, on Feb. 23.
Grammy winner, inductee in the Afropop Worldwide Hall of Fam and recipient of many other awards and plaudits, the Benin-born Kidjo, now living in Brooklyn, brings a fresh sound rarely heard in these parts.

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And All the Awards (Should) Go To . . .

The Music Scene

Well, we made it to 2013 without the world ending. To celebrate, I’d like to look back at some of the musicians who left their mark on 2012.
It’s impossible to discuss the seemingly infinite number of artists and songs we heard over a 365-day period in this column, so we’re going to need some sort of beacon to guide us through the sea of one-hit-wonders and talented bands.
Ah, I’ve got it!
The Grammy Awards!

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Oh, Where are the Sounds of Silence?

The Music Scene

All I want for Hanukkah this year is … QUIET!!
I want to hear the hushed strings of a Rachmaninov concerto.
I want to fall into an absorbing movie and forget where I am.
But I can’t.
Bah! Humbug!
Silence at the movies? Forget it. It seems to be a thing of the past.

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When Change Is Good . . . and Inspiring

darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

When Matisyahu’s single “King Without a Crown” was released in 2005, I remember being impressed by this Hasidic reggae artist. His rhythmic beats and traditional Jewish outfit — complete with full beard and black suit — made for a unique combination, and put him directly in the public eye.
Admittedly, I didn’t follow Matisyahu (born Matthew Miller) past his debut album, but my interest was piqued when I learned that he will be playing an acoustic show at Club Helsinki in nearby Hudson, NY, on Monday, Dec. 17.

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A Little Urban Glamour Near Home

The Music Scene

Every week, “from the Deluxe Living Room high atop Lexington Avenue” comes NPR’s “Radio Deluxe.” What follows is an hour or two of patter and cooing conversation by hosts John Pizzarelli and Jessica Molaskey, and a breezy jaunt through the American songbook, swing, classic jazz and Broadway tunes.

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Stars Rising at Infinity Hall

The Music Scene
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

With so many artists out there, it can be difficult to weed through all of the albums and find that next great performer to add to your playlist. Luckily, Infinity Hall in Norfolk has handpicked three bands that deserve your attention: The Adam Ezra Group, the Alternate Routes and the Jason Spooner Band.

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There Music Is

The Music Scene

The American composer John Cage would have turned 100 this year (he died in 1992), and to honor his centennial, Bard College is presenting, “John Cage: On & Off the Air” this weekend, focusing on Cage’s use of technology.
Cage was born less than a year before the world première of Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” when the modern broke from the past.

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More Baroque, This One Polish

The Music Scene

In an age of instant global connectivity and increasingly homogeneous world culture, it is difficult to imagine a time when cultural identity had strong national roots, and cultural trends that did cross boundaries opened up whole new worlds of possibility.

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Banjos, Mandolins, Voices And a Lot of Good Jokes

The Music Scene
darrylg@lakevillejournal.com

I’ve been a fan of Stephen Lynch’s brand of musical comedy since his first Comedy Central Presents special aired in 2000. If you’ve never seen it, Lynch uses an acoustic guitar and his impressive voice to sing about superheroes such as Immigration Dude, and to tell his little girl “why mommy’s not here anymore” through a lullaby. (Disclaimer: Even though I just mentioned superheroes and lullabies, Lynch’s humor is not for children or people who are easily offended.)

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A Closer Look at Brahms

The Music Scene

Legend has it that Brahms spent many years of his early composing life intimidated by Beethoven’s specter. He was unable to compose a symphony for decades because of what the master had accomplished with his nine — none more monumental than the Ninth Symphony itself, with its “Ode to Joy” finale.

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