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The Millerton News Opinion/Viewpoint

What kind of timber is so popular that thieves steal it?

EarthTalk

Dear EarthTalk: I heard that timber thefts are increasing across the country. Why would people steal timber and is it a particular kind for a particular use?
Rosie Ng
Stanwood, Wash.
People are stealing timber for the same reasons they steal anything: to profit from someone else’s hard work. What makes timber thefts that much harder to stop is the fact that, most of the time, they occur in remote forested areas and loggers typically don’t have to document their sales as meticulously as other kinds of natural resource extraction.

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Millerton Lions Club plants tree in memory of William Shaughnasey

Lions Tales

Spring has sprung, and so have we — into action for the new year. The Millerton Lions Club’s first meeting of 2011 was held Wednesday, March 30, at American Legion Post 178 on Route 44 in Millerton. Great food, great meeting place, and great to see everyone again.
Todd Clinton got our attention with a little glass-clinking, called the meeting to order and we were on our way ….

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How much nutritional value is in carrots and other produce grown today?

EarthTalk

Dear EarthTalk: What’s the nutritional difference between the carrot I ate in 1970 and one I eat today? I’ve heard that that there’s very little nutrition left. Is that true?
Esther G.
Newark, N.J.
It would be overkill to say that the carrot you eat today has very little nutrition in it — especially compared to some of the other less healthy foods you likely also eat — but it is true that fruits and vegetables grown decades ago were much richer in vitamins and minerals than the varieties most of us get today.

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Turtle Crossing

Editorial Cartoon

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Falling under the Easter Bunny’s lure

The Millerton News Editorial

It’s nice sometimes to take a break from all the chaos in the world and appreciate that which is sweet in life — including those moments we can share with our families. That’s why it’s so important to thank our local towns, recreation committees, PTAs, fire departments, gun clubs, American Legions and other volunteers who take the time each year to organize what amounts to uninhibited, joyous frivolity — not only for youngsters but for entire family units — throughout the region come the spring holidays.

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Fishin’ fool

The Country Curmudgeon

These days I am pretty much an indoor animal. Not so in my younger days. During high school I developed a perverse passion for freshwater fishing. I would become The Compleat Angler. The insane part was that I lived on Long Island, which was a salt-water fishing paradise.
From my centrally located home in Nassau County I could travel 10 or 15 miles north or south to either Long Island Sound or the Great South Bay and Atlantic Ocean. Fluke, flounder and weakfish swam in abundance to the north while bluefish, sea bass and more fluke and flounder waited for hooks to be baited in the south.

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Why young Americans should be very afraid

A View From the Edge

Mom and Dad are moving in with you as soon as they reach 65. Get that spare bedroom ready, move brothers and sisters in together. We’re turning back the clock to pre-World War II: The family unit is back and the retired are, once again, about to be the burden of those still working.
Come to think of it, little Johnny and Suzy had better get an after-school job to help the family make ends meet. And you can forget about school loans for the high-school graduates, that first car, holidays or remodeling your kitchen — no one will be able to afford them soon, either.

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Constructive criticism

The Millerton News Editorial

No one likes being criticized. But constructive criticism is slightly different. It’s intended to help, to guide and to improve. By and large such critique is beneficial and, by definition, should not be about disparagement but analysis.
In the case of North East property owners’ recent criticism of the townwide reassessment project, that line is razor thin. Let’s hope that precipice is respected, by all sides involved in this complicated issue, and the importance of the subject at hand does not get muddled with personal attacks and accusations.

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Make up our minds

The Country Curmudgeon

Coffee is good for us again. When I was a kid it was part of a complete (adult) breakfast, along with Danish. Then the “experts” decided coffee was bad for us, possibly carcinogenic. Now it is good for us, stimulating something or another, but especially the economy.
The sun used to be a good thing. “Get out in the sun!” my mom used to say. Now they practically tell us to wear burkas. Better yet, don’t go outside. We could link our homes with places we need to go by tunnel, like the gopher in “Caddyshack,” while singing, “I’m all right.”

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I do not talk to cereal boxes (yet, anyway)

A View From the Edge

In the supermarket the other day, I was looking at the ingredients of sugar-frosted-honey-bombs-with-freeze-dried-strawberries (leading ingredient corn, followed by corn sweetener) and there it was, the new media world all wrapped up in one sentence: “If you enjoyed our product, follow us on Twitter and Facebook!”
It was not a question, it was a command.

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