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Lakeville Journal Sports

The fast and the furless: Jumpfest’s Human Dog Sled Race

The first night of the Salisbury Winter Sports Association  Jumpfest weekend brought out a dedicated and boisterous bunch to Satre Hill on Feb. 10. 
The crowds fought off the 18-degree weather by drinking beer and huddling around bonfires for the target jumping event and then the excitement of the Human Dog Sled Race. 

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Fishing in winter is not as crazy as it sounds

On Saturday, Jan. 28, I was feeling more than a little stir-crazy. So I went fishing.
This isn’t as crazy as it sounds.
First of all, there was not a lot of snow at the time. Second, the temperatures had been well above freezing, so ice would probably not be an issue.
Third, I had a new little fiberglass rod in my mitts that required a tryout.

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Record attendance at 91st Jumpfest

No records were broken by the ski jumpers this year but the crowd attending the Jumpfest competition on Saturday, Feb. 11, was the largest ever. Salisbury Winter Sports Association (SWSA) Director Willie Hallihan said that between 1,100 and 1,200 tickets were sold.
“And that doesn’t include the number of kids who came, which was probably another 500,” he added. 
And then of course there were the dogs; it seemed as though there was one dog for every dozen people. 

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One giant leap for ski-kind...

Safe to say that this year’s Salisbury Winter Sports Association Jumpfest was like none other. The Friday target jumping contest went into overtime for the first time; the weather was perfect on Saturday, attracting a record-breaking crowd; and there was a massive snowstorm Sunday, but the jumping went on in spite of it. 

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Wins in ice hockey, varsity girls and JV boys b-ball

Housatonic ice hockey started the week off with an overtime win, 3-2, on Wednesday, Feb. 1, against the Redhawks at Norwich Free Academy. Connor Toffey and Anthony Robarge scored during regular time, with Finn Bambery scoring the winning goal in OT. 
In wrestling, Will Fallon won by forfeit against St. Paul. 
The ski team finished second overall in the slalom race at Catamount. Alex Vernali placed in the top 10, with Jack Wayne and Calvin O’Connor placing in the top 15. Molly Dowd finished second among female racers. 

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Southern comfort for the big game

SHARON — Barbecue is big in the South but you can still find it north of the Mason-Dixon line. Sharon is fortunate to have its own authentic barbecue restaurant, When Pigs Fly South. 
Inspired by his family’s Louisiana roots and his Atlanta, Ga., upbringing, chef and restaurant owner Bennett Chinn has been serving up this Southern comfort food since he opened the eatery on West Main Street in 2009. 

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How to watch the Super Bowl like a coach

Place your bets, prepare your snacks, gather your lucky rabbit’s foot: Super Bowl LI is this Sunday, Feb. 5. 
The New England Patriots, Deflategate and suspensions left in the past, will enter their record-breaking ninth Super Bowl and take on the Atlanta Falcons. 

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Many HVRHS teams enjoy victories

The girls varsity basketball team continued their winning streak by beating four-time Class S State Finalist Thomaston on Wednesday, Jan. 25. In front of a packed house, the Lady Mountaineers fought back from being down after three quarters to win 46-43. 
Chloe Dakers led in scoring with 17 points, followed by Caroline Hurlburt (7) and Emily Geyselaers (6). 

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Coaching, team spirit bring Housy girls to number one

FALLS VILLAGE —Walking up to the Housatonic girls basketball team is more like meeting a family than a competitive high school sports team. With just over 10 players on the varsity team, “Everyone is really close,” according to junior Olivia Forstmann. Emily Geyselaers chimed in,  “It really helps that we can trust each other, we build each other up instead of break each other down.”  

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Danger in the coal pit

The upper Housatonic River valley brims with defunct ore mines, abandoned blast furnaces, forgotten lime kilns and, scattered hither and beyond on our hillsides, the remains of several thousand outdoor charcoal hearths, recognizable to the keen eye for their round, raised earthen platforms and dearth of tree growth (excepting birch, which doesn’t mind the pyrolitic acid in the soil). If you find one hearth, you’ll find more nearby. 
Charcoal was labor intensive and one of the most expensive aspects of iron processing here.

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