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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

The Ides of March

Editorial Cartoon

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Rules of tenure should change

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Teachers have become convenient targets for the frustrations felt by taxpayers as it becomes more and more evident that taxes will be rising once the state budget is finalized in Hartford. Because of strong unions and a well-defined system of seniority and remuneration based on education and experience, public-school teachers have maintained their salary and benefit levels through the recession. This, of course, while others in the private sector have seen their own salaries and benefits diminish, or lost their jobs altogether.

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Turning Back The Pages 3-24

Turning Back The Pages

75 years ago — March 1936
Reflections of the Season (editorial): Maybe you don’t believe in signs, but under the new motor laws, “stop” signs really mean stop. The signs wouldn’t be there unless they meant it. There is no one in such a hurry that he cannot obey the signs. Most of the hurry is imaginary anyway. The drivers only think they are in a hurry.

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Jack’s journal: on the Appalachian Trail

Guest Commentary

Editor’s note: In Tara Kelly’s “Consider This” column published March 10, titled “Helicopter Mom,” she described her anxiety in seeing her teenage son, Jack, go off with his buddy for a hike on the southern arm of the Appalachian Trail. She promised us that Jack would share his journal with us upon his return, in hopes that her worry would have been for naught. It apparently was, as evidenced below. Here is Jack’s condensed hiking journal, and it is just the tonic to prepare us all for some bracing spring walks, long or short, on the trail.
Day One, March 7, 2011

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The corruption of the education system

Guest Commentary

This is the second of a two-part series. See the first part at tcextra.com or in last week’s paper.
The stress coming from all directions harms students in many ways. On top of school and all that applies to it, teenagers often are encouraged or forced to work a regular job. When students are not returning home until late in the evening or night, they run short on time to study or do homework. As a result, students must stay up late into the night, creating a common lack of proper sleep.

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A war withut asking; and a rationale for bloat

The Chris Powell Column

Another day, another imperial war. This time it’s intervention in the civil war in Libya, whose mode of governance suddenly is considered a crucial interest of the United States, though nobody suggested as much only a few weeks ago. A few weeks ago, the United States and its allies were happy to help pump and purchase Libya’s oil and thus finance the regime of the dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Blumenthal speaks

If You Ask Me

I see Sen. Blumenthal made his maiden speech the other day to remind us he’s still fighting for us. Don’t you wish he’d stop with the fighting?
Blumenthal started fighting for us in his Senate campaign when his opponent’s reluctance to speak to real issues let him get away with it, but he’s continued to use that very tired refrain as a senator.

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Spring fever

Nature's Notebook

The water is high, and with all the snowmelt I can see bare ground for the first time since the turn of the year. The frozen earth has a skin of deepening mud, as those who travel our unpaved country roads will discover anew as the weather warms in the coming weeks.
I can remember mud season from when I was growing up in Millbrook, N.Y., when dirt roads became impassible to anything smaller than farm machinery, and these left deep gummy ruts, rimmed overnight with brittle ice teeth.

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Consolidation would weaken agencies

Guest Commentary

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has proposed a merger of five independent government “watchdog” agencies into a single super-sized agency to be called the Office of Government Accountability.
Every governor since William A. O’Neill has suggested similar, superficially appealing legislation. But when those bills were examined in public, they were defeated because they would create a more expensive bureaucracy, result in less rather than more transparency and accountability and effectively gut some of the best and most well-regarded government agencies.

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Japan

Editorial Cartoon

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