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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Legislative session seemed more delusional than it was liberal

The Chris Powell Column

According to The New York Times, the Connecticut legislative session just concluded was the most “activist” and “liberal” session in memory as the state’s first formally Democratic governor (remember Lowell Weicker?) in 20 years got to work with another overwhelmingly Democratic General Assembly to enact the biggest tax increase in the state’s history.

Cyberwarfare: the coming battles

A View From the Edge

In the next three weeks, this column will take you on a tour of the newest form of warfare. Cyberwarfare: the bloody battles already being fought, the mind-shredding complexities, the threats even minor enemies can impose, the plans to defend our nation and allies and, never least, what the youth of the country need to gear up for.

So, let’s start with a simple question: How serious is this new form of warfare?

Mountain lions seen at last?

Nature's Notebook

Last Saturday, a 140-pound male Eastern mountain lion was struck and killed on the Wilbur Cross Parkway in Milford, Conn. There were strong sightings the week before in Greenwich, about 30 miles away, quite possibly the same animal.

The Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection is working on the standard hypothesis that this was an illegally held captive animal that somehow got loose, perhaps wandering over from New York, as the eastern mountain lion is officially extinct outside of the Florida panther subspecies.

Hamptons

Editorial Cartoon

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Is open government at risk in Connecticut?

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Some Connecticut residents might take their Freedom of Information Commission for granted. It’s been in Hartford for 36 years, long enough so that many adults don’t remember how things went in matters of government accountability before the commission was created. But some do remember having no real recourse when government chose not to be transparent, no place to go to complain about lack of governmental openness and abuse of power. They’ll tell you it’s better now.

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The ‘Arab Spring’ of 2011 and the ‘Chinese Spring’ of 1911

The Long View

“Well Doctor, what have we got — a monarchy or a republic?” Ben Franklin was asked by a female onlooker on the last day of the American constitutional convention in 1787.
“A republic, if you can keep it,” Franklin responded.
Maintaining a republic, of course, is the true problem; and it was on display, recently, as in Warsaw President Obama pledged along with some European nations a substantial sum of money to support the emergence of democratic institutions in the countries that have awakened in the Arab Spring.

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Do you remember your first vote?

If You Ask Me

The first person I ever voted for, former Congressman Peter Frelinghuysen of New Jersey, died May 23 at the age of 95.
I don’t remember why I voted for him or who ran against him, but by all accounts, Frelinghuysen was a good choice. He was running for his first term then and he’d be re-elected for the next 20 years. His son occupies the seat now.
But then as now, being a Frelinghuysen in New Jersey was quite an advantage. He was a member of a political dynasty that produced, since the 1790s, four United States senators as well as the two House members.

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William Welch, and what a Norfolk cemetery tells us

The Body Scientific

I like cemeteries. It may seem morbid, but I do. Norfolk’s cemetery is a fine and private place. But to a student of infectious disease, it is a stone-marked history of wrenching loss and medical helplessness.

I found the graves of young women of the 19th century. One was dead at 23. Childbirth probably took her or puerperal fever in its aftermath. Tuberculosis, too, could carry off a young adult.

Letters to Editor - June 9

Letters to Editor - The Lakeville Journal

Economic dangers ahead for the state of Connecticut

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No, it’s not a lost kite

Nature's Notebook

They aren’t Chinese lanterns. They aren’t abandoned kites caught in the gnarled fingers of the uppermost branches. Those purple things hanging in trees across Connecticut are actually bug traps.
The emerald ash borer (EAB), a beetle native to eastern Asia, has invaded the eastern part of the United States.
The bugs kill ash trees. Adults deposit their larvae one by one into the tree. The larvae feed on the inner bark. When they are fully formed adults and ready to emerge, they burrow out head first, creating a D-shaped exit hole.

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