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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

No, it’s not a lost kite

Nature's Notebook

They aren’t Chinese lanterns. They aren’t abandoned kites caught in the gnarled fingers of the uppermost branches. Those purple things hanging in trees across Connecticut are actually bug traps.
The emerald ash borer (EAB), a beetle native to eastern Asia, has invaded the eastern part of the United States.
The bugs kill ash trees. Adults deposit their larvae one by one into the tree. The larvae feed on the inner bark. When they are fully formed adults and ready to emerge, they burrow out head first, creating a D-shaped exit hole.

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Letters to the Editor June 2

Letter To The Editor - The Lakeville Journal

Letter was an eye-opener

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Too much time with technology?

Guest Commentary

Would it seem plausible that having your children watch Sesame Street rewires their brains? Or that raising children to be dependent on television and other technology for entertainment makes their teachers’ jobs more difficult?
Letting kids use media technology such as cell phones, watching TV and listening to MP3s exposes them to even more sensory input — stimuli — than the average classroom teacher can provide. Consequently, lessons given by the teacher can become boring and repetitive when a 5-year-old is learning numbers and the alphabet via flashing symbols and animation.

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One thing: This money really could have been better spent

If You Ask Me

Do you remember Gov. Rell’s “One Thing” campaign that asked every Connecticut resident to do one thing every day to conserve energy? I don’t either.
I only bring it up because it’s one of many costly projects developed for state agencies by outside public relations and advertising firms that the agencies could have done on their own. Or better yet, not done at all.
Once Gov. Malloy and his people settle the $3 billion deficit matter, they might want to look into this contribution to that deficit.

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Only the poor need Connecticut’s cities

The Chris Powell Column

Celebrating the obvious in a 28-page study aimed at political candidates, the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities proclaimed late last year that Hartford, Bridgeport, New Haven and Waterbury are poor and have special needs and thus a special claim on state government’s resources.
No one would dispute the poverty. But the report’s argument for pouring still more money into those cities was weak.

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Flooding can bring opportunities

The Independent Investor

The flooding of the Mississippi River will be the worst disaster in the Delta farming region’s history since 1927. Millions of fertile acres in Missouri, Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas are under water. Farms along that riverbank could take a $2 billion hit, but to us it simply underscores our argument that agriculture is a long-term growth area.

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I'll Bee Beck

Editorial Cartoon

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The evidence of heart in our small towns

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

There was a quote by Bob Estabrook, this newspaper’s editor-and-publisher emeritus and a veteran himself, on the front page of last week’s Lakeville Journal. He said, “The heart of a small town is most evident on Memorial Day.”

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Turning Back The Pages 6-2

75 years ago — 1936
Reflections of the Season (editorial): And still there is a strange absence of political bedtime stories and election only six months away.
SALISBURY — The Elm Beetle is unusually destructive this spring. Many of the centennial elms are suffering from this pest. Fortunately plans are being made to combat it.
LIME ROCK — Mrs. Carolyn Stanton returned to the home of C. Brasie in Lime Rock after caring for a patient in Millerton.
50 years ago — 1961

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Sometimes what’s there can work

The Garden Coach

Sometimes looking more and doing less makes for a more satisfying landscape. When a fellow Kent resident asked me to design a garden to screen his work area from family activities, the first thing I asked was what they already had. The reply — “Oh, it’s just the woods” — made me expect the same invasive garlic mustard, Japanese honeysuckle and trees girdled and broken by oriental bittersweet that are taking over more and more of our woods every year.

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