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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Just change the name and let the taxpayers get the credit

If You Ask Me

There was a time when public buildings at places like the University of Connecticut were named for people who had contributed something significant to the institution — and it didn’t have to be money.
The campus is dotted with aging buildings named for professors, who are always described as beloved; college presidents Albert Jorgensen and Homer Babbidge, who were around long enough to be remembered; and even the occasional politician like Ray Baldwin, the governor when Connecticut State College became the university in 1939.

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The eternal Drug War

Body Politic

The Afghanistan War seems interminable. It is the longest hot war in U.S. history. Europe’s Hundred Years War remains the world record holder, but things moved slower back then. Pentagon officials appear to dream of setting a new record in Kabul.
Meanwhile, our War on Drugs is quietly building its own longevity record. This war dates back to the Nixon administration and shows little sign of abating.

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Birds in the wake of spring

Nature's Notebook

It’s hard to imagine that spring might be around the corner, but there are some signs. First off, Punxsutawney Phil did not see his shadow in Pennsylvania and called for an early spring. And Chuckles VII, a groundhog at the Lutz Children’s Museum in Manchester, Conn., agreed!

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Are electronic toll systems environmentally efficient?

EarthTalk

Dear EarthTalk: Has the use of E-ZPass and similar programs to facilitate faster highway toll-paying cut down on traffic jams and therefore tailpipe pollution? Why do we need tolls at all?
Dianne Comstock
New York, N.Y.
 

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Question brings life to important program

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Are You Okay? It’s a question asked millions of times by millions of people every day. It’s also the name of a program that could very easily save your life.

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So long, Q103, and thanks

The Lakeville Journal Editorial
editor@lakevillejournal.com

The loss of a local media outlet is to be mourned at any time. The health of any community depends on a steady flow of good information going out to its residents, whether on the airwaves, on paper, online or by satellite or cable TV. However, in this day of dwindling small-market, independent media, it is particularly difficult for communities to accept such a local closure, especially when an outlet has been a part of the local psyche for years.

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Turning Back The Pages

Turning Back The Pages

75 years ago — February 1936
Reflections of the Season (editorial): The oil tank and coal bin are now engaged in a hot contest to see which can dig deeper into the old man’s pocketbook. The latest returns indicate that the two are running a “dead heat.”
SALISBURY — Maurice O’Halloran has accepted a position at the William Piel farm on the Lime Rock road.
Those over 65 who wish to apply for Old Age Assistance should do so at once.
ORE HILL — Michael Meehan is confined to the house with a severe cold.
50 years ago — February 1961

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A nation is born: dispatch from the Southern Sudan

Guest Commentary

It’s not often that a new nation is founded as the result of a well-supported, peaceful and legal vote. Rarer still is having such an outcome after a protracted civil war.

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