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Funds needed for new SVAS ambulance

SALISBURY
The Salisbury Volunteer Ambulance Service (SVAS) has started a “Campaign for a New Ambulance.”
The SVAS volunteers want to buy a new ambulance on a Ford F-450 chassis. The price is steep: $250,000.
The ambulance that SVAS wishes to replace is 20 years old, does not meet new state standards, and lacks updated technology.
And, according to Pat Barton, the SVAS chief of service, the undercarriage is rusty.
“Nobody wants to be Fred Flintstone,” she said in an interview on Saturday, Feb. 11.

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It’s important to learn how to listen to your body

KENT
The modern world is busy. There are appointments to keep, schedules to manage,  problems to solve. In the hustle and bustle, it’s easy to ignore the subtle ways our bodies communicate with us. 
In a talk on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Kent Memorial Library, Deborah Bain, registered nurse and founder of Prism Health Advocates, emphasized the importance of paying attention to what your body tells you.

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Eat a glass of water through lettuce, radishes and celery

Lately I have been drinking water out of a large plastic take-out soup container instead of from a cup.
I understand that there are concerns about the chemicals in plastic getting into my water; the point I’m trying to make is that even though I must be drinking about a gallon of water every day, I’m still dehydrated. This seems to be true for almost everyone I know; I don’t know if this is an extra dry winter or what but it seems like I just can’t get enough water. 

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Yes, this article is actually about broccoli

S
o my editor just handed me a press release from the BBC that says at the very top in overly large letters, “Britain’s courgette crisis.”
Since I had no idea what that meant, I read the first sentence, which helpfully explained, “Britain is currently in the throes of a courgette crisis.”
My first guess was that they were having trouble with one of those cute little sports cars they make over there. 

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For winter sports fans: the best body warmers

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

The annual ski jumps of the Salisbury Winter Sports Association are coming up, Feb. 10 to 12 at Satre Hill. If you want to know the schedule of jumps and other events (including target jumping under the lights and the Human Dog Sled Race), go to www.jumpfest.org.

If you want to know the best products to buy to keep your body warm while you watch the athletes sail past you, then read on.

Balm for the bees, planting a pollinator’s delight

KENT — There are 349 different species of bees in Connecticut. Vitally important, these tiny insects are to thank for making possible the fruits and vegetables we eat and are an indicator of the health of the overall ecosystem. 
In a talk cosponsored by the Kent Garden Club and the Kent Memorial Library at Town Hall on Saturday, Jan. 28, South Kent resident Karen Bussolini spoke about how to make a difference in our own yards and communities by planting year-round pollinator gardens.

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Medical Examiners: not as seen on TV

brucep@lakevillejournal.com

POUGHKEEPSIE — Most people probably realize that a medical examiner’s office doesn’t really work the way the ones on “NCIS” and “iZombie” do. But how far afield do the fictionalizations wander?
Dutchess County Chief Forensic Investigator Robert Bready has to explain the workings of a real ME’s office — specifically, the one in Dutchess County — to incoming members of the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). For the session held on Thursday, Jan. 19, the public was invited as well.

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Getting the brushoff can be a good thing — honest

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

When I announced last Saturday night that I’ve begun to “dry brush,” four of the other five women at the dinner table not only knew what I was talking about but also all said, “Dry brushing! That’s good for lymphatic drainage.”

I blush to admit that I didn’t come to dry brushing because I want to improve my lymphatic drainage; I started doing it because I felt like the skin on my legs was becoming, umm, “unattractive,” and I felt that some exfoliation was needed.

Fine friends and new foods

It might seem like a stretch to put this new column on the Health page but here’s the concept: Potluck dinners are a wonderful way to get together in  winter, and they have an inherent health benefit if done with a little energy and “intention” (to use a 2016 buzz word).

Fine friends and new foods

It might seem like a stretch to put this new column on the Health page but here’s the concept: Potluck dinners are a wonderful way to get together in  winter, and they have an inherent health benefit if done with a little energy and “intention” (to use a 2016 buzz word).