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U.S. education: Reforming the system

Part 2 of 8

The purpose of education

Part 1 of 8

Many educators today have expressed deep concerns about the direction education is taking in the USA and Europe. I commented on this, not too seriously, in “US Education: Race to the top or the bottom?” (The Lakeville Journal, Dec. 12 and 19, 2013) The following, which will publish in eight parts over the course of time, is a more serious appeal to educational authority and common sense, to reassess and reform our educational system.

Child vaccination has been vindicated

For a number of years there has been some controversy, particularly in the United States, over the need for, desirability of and safety of immunization against common disease of childhood. Reluctance to vaccinate our children seems to reflect legitimate concerns over certain technical issues, such as the possible adverse effects of some “adjuvants” combined with some misplaced religious beliefs not supported by Scripture or reason.

Child vaccination vindicated

For a number of years there has been some controversy, particularly in the United States, over the need for, desirability of and safety of immunization against common disease of childhood. Reluctance to vaccinate our children seems to reflect legitimate concerns over certain technical issues, such as the possible adverse effects of some “adjuvants” combined with some misplaced religious beliefs not supported by Scripture or reason.

Nobel Prize for Edward Snowden?

Edward Snowden’s disastrous revelations about NSA eavesdropping on millions of Americans and foreign persons, friends and foes, metadata and content alike, came as a terrible surprise for most (but not all) Americans as well as allies around the world. Snowden clearly violated specific laws as well as duty to his government employer. At the same time, Snowden revealed what many Americans see as a federal government program that violates the U.S. Constitution, U.S. national law, international treaties and human rights.

Nobel Prize for Snowden?

Edward Snowden’s disastrous revelations about NSA eavesdropping on millions of Americans and foreign persons, friends and foes, metadata and content alike, came as a terrible surprise for most (but not all) Americans as well as allies around the world. Snowden clearly violated specific laws as well as duty to his government employer. At the same time, Snowden revealed what many Americans see as a federal government program that violates the U.S. Constitution, U.S. national law, international treaties and human rights.

Nobel Prize for Edward Snowden?

Edward Snowden’s disastrous revelations about NSA eavesdropping on millions of Americans and foreign persons, friends and foes, metadata and content alike, came as a terrible surprise for most (but not all) Americans as well as allies around the world. Snowden clearly violated specific laws as well as duty to his government employer. At the same time, Snowden revealed what many Americans see as a federal government program that violates the U.S. Constitution, U.S. national law, international treaties and human rights.

The U.S. Constitution protects foreign persons, too

Here in America there is an almost universal belief or consensus that the U.S. Constitution protects “persons” who are Americans, but not foreign persons. (There is no mention of foreigners in the Constitution.) This correlates with the doctrine of “American exceptionalism.”

Race to the top or to the bottom?

U.S. education:

Part 2 of 2

Today we are moving still further ahead. What we have realized is we have to adopt a more “business” approach to education, in order to support jobs and financial success in America. President Barack Obama is willing to go along with this, not because he knows anything about it (he went to law school, not business school) but because he knows we are in an international “Race to the Top,” and if we don’t win it, we’ll lose it. And winning is everything.

Race to the top or to the bottom?

U.S. education:

Part I of 2

Education is not my field, as you probably can tell. Still, I believe I’m a serious observer of the current scene, and like many Americans I believe that “beliefs” are more important than “facts,” which tend to be subjective anyway.