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Guest Commentary

A new trend toward realism in young adult literature

About a month ago, I found myself in a movie theater watching one of the most highly anticipated movies of the year — “The Fault in Our Stars,” based on a novel by John Green.

Three things about this experience struck me:

First, Shailene Woodley really has come a long way since her days on the ABC Family show, “The Secret Life of the American Teenager.”

Second, Nat Wolff has also evolved since his days of working in The Naked Brothers Band.

Community banks are just that: part of the community

Normally, I try to ignore op-eds in The Lakeville Journal with which I disagree. But the op-ed from the Aug. 21 edition, titled “An American banking revolution awaits,” so irked me that I cannot ignore it.

 

A new trend toward realism in young adult literature

About a month ago, I found myself in a movie theater watching one of the most highly anticipated movies of the year — “The Fault in Our Stars,” based on a novel by John Green.

Three things about this experience struck me:

First, Shailene Woodley really has come a long way since her days on the ABC Family show, “The Secret Life of the American Teenager.”

Second, Nat Wolff has also evolved since his days of working in The Naked Brothers Band.

Asi es la vida

There’s an expression I hear often in Guatemala – “Asi es la vida.” That’s life.

Last month, my friend Charlie Gomez died suddenly — and unexpectedly — at age 24.

Back and forth and back

A discussion between Sharon’s own James L. Buckley and Anthony Piel about the U.S. Supreme Court Hobby Lobby case was spurred on first by a Lakeville Journal editorial, which published on July 10, after the decision. On July 24, a letter to the editor from Buckley rebutted some points made in the editorial. Then, on July 31, Piel responded in a letter to the editor to Buckley’s letter.

Now, Buckley and Piel are continuing some back-and-forth to drill down on some of the finer points of the way they believe the justices may have, or should have, viewed the case.

Asi es la vida, or ‘That’s life,’ as they say in Guatemala — an assessment

There’s an expression I hear often in Guatemala – “Asi es la vida.” That’s life.

Last month, my friend Charlie Gomez died suddenly — and unexpectedly — at age 24.

The future of agriculture at Pine Plains Central School District

The agricultural program and FFA are arguably the pride and joy of the Pine Plains Central School District (PPCSD). Rich in history, they have been a part of the education of thousands of students for many decades.
Despite their history and being in a farm-​rich area, interest in the programs has fluctuated over the years. During the 1950s-60s, they flourished with large student and community involvement. By the 1970s however, there was no agricultural program, let alone an “Ag Fair.” Today, 40 years later, the district now finds itself somewhere between the two.

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Millennials will change politics

According to a national survey conducted during the 2012 election by Richard Fox, a professor of political science at Loyola Marymount University, and Jennifer Lawless, professor of government at American University, only 11 percent of American college and high school students reported they might want to run for political office someday. Given several leadership positions to choose from, including business executive and school principal, these same students reported that serving as a mayor, or as a member of congress, were the least desirable.

Court’s reasoning is pure bunkum

It’s a big question really. Why would seven judges decide that the police can keep information about crime secret from the American public? That is essentially what the state Supreme Court did July 7.

Before becoming supreme court justices, four of the seven who decided the case were either prosecutors or city attorneys, one was an FBI agent — species not prone to informing the public. The justice who wrote the 27-page opinion, Richard Robinson, (there are no concurring or dissenting opinions) worked as a city lawyer for Stamford Mayor Dan Malloy.

Court’s reasoning is pure bunkum

It’s a big question really. Why would seven judges decide that the police can keep information about crime secret from the American public? That is essentially what the state Supreme Court did July 7.

Before becoming supreme court justices, four of the seven who decided the case were either prosecutors or city attorneys, one was an FBI agent — species not prone to informing the public. The justice who wrote the 27-page opinion, Richard Robinson, (there are no concurring or dissenting opinions) worked as a city lawyer for Stamford Mayor Dan Malloy.