Login

Food for Health

What about when life doesn’t even give you lemons?

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

If life gives you lemons, then of course you’ll make lemonade, especially if it’s a hot summer like this one has been. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Everything is peachy as summer hits its peak

Peach season is officially in full swing, and this year’s peaches have been noticeably large and delicious, possibly because of the heavy rainfall this summer. 
Peaches are a versatile fruit that can be enjoyed on their own or mixed into any number of recipes. My personal favorite is peach pie, but peaches can also be used in salads, oatmeal, smoothies and even salsa. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The balancing act of citrus fruits high in vitamin C

Citrus fruits pack a punch with loads of health benefits — and they can make you pucker with their sour to sweet flavors.
During the year we consume a lot of citrus fruits, whether it’s the orange juice we have with breakfast, the lemon we use to flavor our water or the slice of grapefruit we choke down half willingly (and sometimes cheat by adding a spoonful of sugar).
What is commonly known about citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit is that they are high in vitamin C. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

So berry, berry nice in summer

Berries are a tasty, tangy, sweet summer fruit with many surprising benefits. 
Berries are great in just about everything, from pies, desserts, smoothies and fruit salads to green salads. They start our mornings on top of oatmeal, cereal, pancakes, waffles, yogurt or just by themselves; the possibilities are deliciously endless and healthy.
All berries are high in fiber and are much higher in vitamin C than most fruits. Strawberries in particular, are very high in vitamin C. All berries are extremely high in folate and potassium.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Packing a nutritional punch

When walking down the aisle of the supermarket, one may find a new addition to the selection of kiwis. 
Less than 15 years ago, through cross-breeding and grafting, a new species of kiwi called the Golden Kiwifruit was created. 
While having a shorter storage expectancy than regular green kiwis, it has a number of advantages. 
The yellow kiwi gets rid of the fuzz that is so distinctive on the more popular green kiwi, making the skin edible. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Watermelon, more than water and sugar

Whether you are at a picnic, the pool, the beach or just at home barbecuing, watermelon is the go-to for a delicious refreshing treat. Even my furry little beagle, Pebbles, enjoys this juicy fruit.
There is often a misconception that watermelon is just a ton of water and sugar, with little or no nutritional value —possibly because watermelon is made up of approximately 92 percent water. But that means that watermelon is great for hydration —  and it has many other health benefits as well.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Salad days and dandelions

Dandelions must have incredible life force; how else could they thrive and survive when pretty much everyone in America is trying to kill them?
It seems that there is an effort now to stop trying to eradicate these wild green-and-yellow beasts (see the article in this week’s Compass Arts and Entertainment). They’re good for the bees, and we of course want to do all we can to help our pollinators thrive. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The skinny on coconut fat

I’ve cooked for some people with pretty serious food restrictions, either by choice or because of allergies or intolerance.
It’s possible that I am now faced with my greatest challenge. I won’t lay out the full extent of it but I’ll say the list of forbidden foods is umm quite large. He’s a lovely person, however, and therefore worth the effort.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Taking the smell out of cabbage

When we were young and looking for our first apartment, my husband would eliminate certain rental options by wrinkling his nose and saying, “Impossible. It smells like cabbage.”
Not raw cabbage, of course, but the boiled stuff.
What makes cabbage give off such a strong odor when it’s cooking? According to one website, it’s because the amount of sulfur in the leaves increases as you cook them; the longer you cook your cabbage, the stronger the scent will be.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Food safety and power outages

For all you optimists who keep telling me winter is over, let me remind you that in New England, winter truly begins in February. 
Evidence of this is available in the number of snowstorms that have smooshed the region in the past week or so, including one that came with a power outage that lasted from eight hours to a week depending on where you live. 
I say “one” power outage knowing that another one could follow at any moment (perhaps even one that the region after this issue, and this article, went to press). 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.