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Food for Health

The limits of the large zucchini

Vitamin C is found in unexpected places, such as in zucchini. Who knew, but one medium zucchini has 58 percent of your daily recommended dose of the essential cancer-fighting antioxidant that we normally associate with citrus fruits (and with fighting the common cold). 

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Plum delicious (or do you say ‘plumb’?)

Etymology websites have taught me (just this morning) that the expression is not “plum delicious” but “plumb delicious.” The origin is the French word for lead, plombe.
Meanwhile, the extraordinary French plums called Long Johns have arrived at Paley’s Farm Market in Sharon. I feel very special: Farmer Charlie Paley actually emailed me to announce the plums were arriving late last Friday, Sept. 7. He knows that I am a Long John plum enthusiast of the highest degree.

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Pesto season has arrived

If you read the health page article on tomatoes in the Aug. 23 issue of The Lakeville Journal, then you know that I was nervous that I got Mafalda’s tomato sauce recipe slightly wrong.
Which is exactly what happened.
For those of you who missed that article, I recently visited my friend Tina in Seattle, Wash., and had the good fortune to be invited to dinner at the home of her mother, the excellent cook Mafalda Scoccolo.

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Sweet dreams of sweet cherries

Cherries, while indigenous to Europe, have become a staple American food. The U.S. is ranked second in production of sweet cherries. Washington state in particular is a center of cherry production. New England and New York orchards also produce, although on a smaller scale and often with more of an emphasis on sour than sweet.
Cherries are one of the foods that have good taste and an abundance of natural benefits.

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Tomatoes: Forgive me, Mafalda, if I got this wrong

As tomato years go, it’s been kind of moderate. It isn’t one of those years where you have so many tomatoes on the vine that you just give up trying to pick them all. 
But it also hasn’t been a year of massive blight despite the wet weather. If you’ve lived here for a few years, you might remember that one very bad blight year, when everyone was worried that the soil would be contaminated for years to come.

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What about when life doesn’t even give you lemons?

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

If life gives you lemons, then of course you’ll make lemonade, especially if it’s a hot summer like this one has been. 

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Everything is peachy as summer hits its peak

Peach season is officially in full swing, and this year’s peaches have been noticeably large and delicious, possibly because of the heavy rainfall this summer. 
Peaches are a versatile fruit that can be enjoyed on their own or mixed into any number of recipes. My personal favorite is peach pie, but peaches can also be used in salads, oatmeal, smoothies and even salsa. 

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The balancing act of citrus fruits high in vitamin C

Citrus fruits pack a punch with loads of health benefits — and they can make you pucker with their sour to sweet flavors.
During the year we consume a lot of citrus fruits, whether it’s the orange juice we have with breakfast, the lemon we use to flavor our water or the slice of grapefruit we choke down half willingly (and sometimes cheat by adding a spoonful of sugar).
What is commonly known about citrus fruits such as oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit is that they are high in vitamin C. 

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So berry, berry nice in summer

Berries are a tasty, tangy, sweet summer fruit with many surprising benefits. 
Berries are great in just about everything, from pies, desserts, smoothies and fruit salads to green salads. They start our mornings on top of oatmeal, cereal, pancakes, waffles, yogurt or just by themselves; the possibilities are deliciously endless and healthy.
All berries are high in fiber and are much higher in vitamin C than most fruits. Strawberries in particular, are very high in vitamin C. All berries are extremely high in folate and potassium.

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Packing a nutritional punch

When walking down the aisle of the supermarket, one may find a new addition to the selection of kiwis. 
Less than 15 years ago, through cross-breeding and grafting, a new species of kiwi called the Golden Kiwifruit was created. 
While having a shorter storage expectancy than regular green kiwis, it has a number of advantages. 
The yellow kiwi gets rid of the fuzz that is so distinctive on the more popular green kiwi, making the skin edible. 

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