Login

Food for Health

’Tis the season for plain toast and tea

Like a bad house guest, the flu season arrived in the Northwest Corner in December and still  has not left. 
I personally feel its presence acutely because I was sick all day Wednesday; but I’m one of the lucky few who is up and out of bed after only one day of misery.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Warming winter foods and your yin and yang balance

Hang on, we’re about to get a little woo-woo here. This column is about Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and the idea of eating special seasonal foods to counteract the effects of the weather (in this case: winter weather). 
Last month was the beginning of the Chinese Lunar Year, of course (happy year of the pig!). But I’ve just been thinking generally about the TCM recommendation that, when it’s very cold, you should eat foods that are warming and that heat up your body, especially your kidneys.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Walnuts, the anti-Alzheimer’s food

I guess by now we all know that nuts are good for our bodies. Here’s some extra information on the weird and wonderful ways that walnuts are healthy.
Most memorable: An article about walnuts online at www.medicalnewstoday.com (which seems like a mostly legitimate website) claims that men who eat walnuts see a significant  increase in the vitality of their sperm. Anyone interested in starting a family might want to keep that in mind. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Dangerous vegetables, part 2: Brussels sprouts

It’s amazing how many ways we have found to make Brussels sprouts not just unhealthy but downright dangerous. 
Take one popular Brussels sprouts recipe from the internet: it features shaved sprouts cooked with bacon. Just use a mandoline to shred those little green balls of cruciferous goodness!

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Going nuts over pecans

There is a debate raging with great heat in The Lakeville Journal newsroom at this moment about how to pronounce the word “pecan.”
But something about which there seems to be no debate: Pecans are really good for you. 
The Georgia pecan growers’ association does not shy from hyperbole when speaking of these mighty little bites, calling them “nutrition in a nutshell.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A truly, astoundingly magnificent pulled pork recipe

As I’ve said before, I grew up in the 1970s in a somewhat Jewish household so I didn’t eat much pork when I was a youngster. 
Since moving here to the Northwest Corner, I seem to be constantly being offered pork at dinner parties; and I’ve recently begun to cook and enjoy it on my own. 
My latest favorite dish is an 8-hour slow-cooked pork roast that is magnificent and very easy to make.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The limits of the large zucchini

Vitamin C is found in unexpected places, such as in zucchini. Who knew, but one medium zucchini has 58 percent of your daily recommended dose of the essential cancer-fighting antioxidant that we normally associate with citrus fruits (and with fighting the common cold). 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Plum delicious (or do you say ‘plumb’?)

Etymology websites have taught me (just this morning) that the expression is not “plum delicious” but “plumb delicious.” The origin is the French word for lead, plombe.
Meanwhile, the extraordinary French plums called Long Johns have arrived at Paley’s Farm Market in Sharon. I feel very special: Farmer Charlie Paley actually emailed me to announce the plums were arriving late last Friday, Sept. 7. He knows that I am a Long John plum enthusiast of the highest degree.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Pesto season has arrived

If you read the health page article on tomatoes in the Aug. 23 issue of The Lakeville Journal, then you know that I was nervous that I got Mafalda’s tomato sauce recipe slightly wrong.
Which is exactly what happened.
For those of you who missed that article, I recently visited my friend Tina in Seattle, Wash., and had the good fortune to be invited to dinner at the home of her mother, the excellent cook Mafalda Scoccolo.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Sweet dreams of sweet cherries

Cherries, while indigenous to Europe, have become a staple American food. The U.S. is ranked second in production of sweet cherries. Washington state in particular is a center of cherry production. New England and New York orchards also produce, although on a smaller scale and often with more of an emphasis on sour than sweet.
Cherries are one of the foods that have good taste and an abundance of natural benefits.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.