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Food for Health

How to get moisture in your body

I’m sick. You probably are too, or have been, or have someone in your house or close community of friends who is sick. 
I’m also dehydrated, because I’m older now and my body naturally retains less fluid; because it’s cold and dry everywhere; and because, as noted, I’m sick.
Chicken broth is the answer, as is so often the case.

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How to preserve vitamins — and citrus fruit

At this time of year, everyone needs some vitamin C because everyone is on the edge of catching a cold or flu (everyone). 
Also at this time of year, there are lots of enticing citrus fruits at the grocery store. Clementine oranges (and the many new iterations of the clementine, such as Halos, Cuties and Satsumas) are abundant at every supermarket, and relatively inexpensive. This year’s crop, based on a completely limited and personal survey of available product, seems to be sweet and juicy. 

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A sweet ending to the holiday season

Chestnuts are like the doctors of the nut world: Above all, they do no harm.
Unlike so many luscious, rich, dense, sweet foods, chestnuts are not bad for you. In some ways, they’re even good for you. They have a wee bit of manganese, a mineral that helps keep your skeleton fit and healthy. They have a fair amount of vitamin C (12 percent of your daily dose if you eat an ounce of them) and potassium (5 percent). 

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Foods won’t live forever in your fridge

If you still have food left over from Thanksgiving, it’s time to throw it out. I’m sorry, it just is.
But let’s talk about what to do with leftovers from your end-of-year holiday parties (and obviously this information also applies to all your leftover food, every day of the week).

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Don’t wash your turkey (anymore)

Wow, I looked away for one minute and everything changed.  I remember very distinctly being told in no uncertain terms that I needed to wash my poultry before cooking it (and then ultra sanitize every surface in my kitchen afterward).

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When your friend loves you, she brings beets

My college friend Tina is staying with me this week and because she’s nutty like I am, she brought a suitcase full of fresh beets to me from her father’s farmette in her hometown of Seattle. 
I love beets. My daughter loves beets and she isn’t exactly a big foodie. But so many people dislike beets. It makes me feel fortunate that my mother never inflicted canned beets or other flavorless, vapid variations on me. I came to adulthood ready to accept the delights of a well-cooked beet.

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Apples, custard and inner peace

The delicate early apples that come in late summer are pretty much gone. Now is the time to pick and buy the heartier late summer/early autumn fruits that are less transient and will stay tasty and firm through the winter.
In something that I read recently, a novel about children during World War II, possibly by Kate Atkinson, I became aware of something described as apples in custard. 
That sounded kind of good, so I did some research in the 85-degree heat this week on baking custard and baking apples.

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When your zucchini requires its own wheelbarrow

Just for the record, I am not the one who grew the giant zucchini in the photo, right (I added the mini Tintin toy for scale). It was given to me by my friend and colleague, Libby Hall-Abeel, and I am not going to ask her where she got it because I don’t want to know.

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Plum delicious

I’ve had a love-hate relationship with plums for most of my life. I want to enjoy them; a good plum is divine. But the skin is so often so sour that it ruins the fun for me; and (as with peaches), many supermarket plums never quite ripen to that exquisite place where the fruit is perfectly soft and deliciously sweet. 

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No need to overcook your corn

I ran into my friend Eric yesterday and had to apologize that I haven’t been to his restaurant in Salisbury lately but, really, who wants to eat out in the Northwest Corner in Connecticut when there is so much incredible fresh produce in the backyard garden and at the local farm stand? 
Even people who don’t like to cook or prepare their own meals should be eating at home. It’s late August. 

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