Login

Regional News

HARLEM VALLEY — One week after the birth of her second daughter, Hillsdale’s Jennifer Wakamatsu was happily at home with her family. She had been to the doctor that very day and all was well. Then, all of a sudden, it wasn’t. With no warning at all, Wakamatsu started to hemorrhage and was rushed to the hospital.

By the time she was able to return home three days later, she had lost 50% of the blood in her body. Only the transfusion of seven pints of blood saved her life.

“If it hadn’t been for the blood,”  Wakamatsu reported, “...

Regional News

Mary Nelligan completes public service fellowship

HAMDEN — Mary Nelligan of Colebrook was among Quinnipiac University’s eight Presidential Public Service Fellowship recipients who were recognized at an Aug. 10 luncheon for their hard work this summer.
Nelligan and fellow students La-Toya Aitcheson, Vanessa Baez, Benjamin Cloutier, Devon Jerome, Matthew Pankey, Jamar Paris and Jeremy Stull made brief presentations describing their 10-week summer public service projects in Hamden and North Haven, what they accomplished and what they learned in their fellowships.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Irene spares region from major damage

stefanieg@millertonnews.com

HARLEM VALLEY — Hurricane Irene drenched the Harlem Valley over the weekend, causing flooding, downed electrical wires and damage from fallen trees.
But many local authorities agree that the destruction could have been much worse.
“We were very fortunate,” said Amenia town Supervisor Wayne Euvrard. “The winds weren’t as bad as predicted.”
Pine Plains town Supervisor Gregg Pulver agreed.
“We were very lucky,” said Pulver. “We didn’t have any wide-spread power outages or any big trees down.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

County fair cut short, but still lots of fun

stefanieg@millertonnews.com

RHINEBECK — Last week, Dutchess County hosted its 166th annual county fair at the fairgrounds in Rhinebeck.
The fair was cut two days short due to Hurricane Irene’s fast approach, but between Tuesday, Aug. 23, and Friday, Aug. 26, thousands of people enjoyed milk shakes, cotton candy, carnival rides, fair games, live music performances and shopping.
A county fair would be sorely lacking if it didn’t also include livestock shows, and the Dutchess County Fair didn’t disappoint.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Area recovers from drenching Hurricane Irene

publisher@lakevillejournal.com

The repercussions from Hurricane Irene varied depending upon where one was as the gigantic storm found its way up the East Coast to the Northwest Corner. For some across the region, the predictions leading into the onslaught of the storm were overblown. For others, the warnings were followed by property damage, flooding, loss of trees and loss of power.  

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Virginia earthquake felt in Connecticut, beyond, on Aug. 23

jenniferk@lakevillejournal.com

An earthquake centered in Mineral, Va., Tuesday, Aug. 23, sent shock waves up and down the East Coast that were felt here in the Northwest Corner.
The quake was the strongest to hit the East Coast in 67 years and almost as strong (5.8 on the Richter Scale) as the most powerful quake in Virginia’s recorded history — a 5.9 quake that occurred in May 1897 in Giles County, Va.
At Lakeville Journal Co. headquarters in Lake-
ville, tremors shook the newsroom. Editors reported watching their desks sway.
In Winsted, the quake rattled The Gilbert School.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Riverton Grange holds its 22nd annual fair

shawi@winstedjournal.com

RIVERTON — The Riverton Grange held its 22nd annual Grange Fair on Saturday, Aug. 20. The fair included entries from local farmers, bakers and craftspeople. On display were a large variety of fruits, vegetables, flowers and canned goods.
Grange President Mark Prelli, seen at bottom left, holding an entry in the craft work contest, said the fair is good for the community.
“We have entrants from all over the area,” he said.
Prelli’s aunt, Gladys Anstett, at top right, has been part of the fair for many years.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Concessions deal seen as victory

winstedjournal@sbcglobal.net

HARTFORD — State union employees and government officials expressed joy and relief last week after the State Employee Bargaining Agent Coalition (SEBAC) announced it had ratified a concessions agreement with Gov. Dannel Malloy. The deal, seen as a victory both for state employees and the governor, will prevent widespread layoffs and save an estimated $1.6 billion to balance the state budget over the next two years.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

State police investigate apparent suicide

shawi@winstedjournal.com

TORRINGTON — State police have identified the woman who died Monday, Aug. 15, in an apparent suicide at the Greenwoods Road overpass over Route 8 in the Burrville section of Torrington, just over the Winsted line.
Numerous witnesses reported seeing a grim sight at the location, where Mary Jane Hannon, 45, of 52 Hayden Hill Road, Torrington, appeared to have hanged herself from the highway overpass.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

School districts meet state standards

stefanieg@millertonnews.com

HARLEM VALLEY — The New York State Education Department results of state testing for the 2010-11 school year, released Aug. 11, are used to hold school districts accountable for education achievement.

According to the department’s website, “The federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act requires that the states develop and report on measures of student proficiency in 1) English Language Arts [ELA] and 2) mathematics ... schools or districts that meet predefined goals on these measures are making Adequate Yearly Progress [AYP].”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Concessions deal seen as victory for unions, Gov. Dannel Malloy

winstedjournal@sbcglobal.net

HARTFORD — State union employees and government officials expressed joy and relief last week after the State Employee Bargaining Agent Coalition (SEBAC) announced it had ratified a concessions agreement with Gov. Dannel Malloy. The deal, seen as a victory both for state employees and the governor, will prevent widespread layoffs and save an estimated $1.6 billion to balance the state budget over the next two years.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.