Login

Regional News

AMENIA — On Sunday, Nov. 5, Congregation Beth David invited the community to come explore the abundant history of Afghanistan’s Jewish culture, with a lecture by author Sara Y. Aharon.

All were welcomed to the lecture by the congregation’s president and treasurer, Sherry Frankel. Rabbi Jon Haddon first delivered a touching statement regarding the Manhattan terror attack that took place on Tuesday, Oct. 31.

“We are determined to live our life in that special New York way,” he said. “Our hearts go out to the families of the victims…...

Regional News

Joe Loverro in Windham but still part of Q103

editor@millertonnews.com

WINDHAM, N.Y. — Radio personality Joe Loverro has recently moved from Lakeville, Conn., to Windham, N.Y. But he hasn’t left his listeners behind. He can still be heard on Q103online.com, which serves Connecticut’s Litchfield Hills, New York’s Central Hudson Valley and Massachusetts’ Southern Berkshires.
Loverro will continue to bring music and community events to his fans. He remains co-station manager, along with Jay Fink, of Q103, formerly known as WQQQ.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Morrissey vs. Sullivan in Boston Corner match in 1853

By Paxton Butler
COPAKE — A professional boxing match that lasted for 37 rounds? It’s an awe-inspiring tale in many ways — especially since it was not a modern-day match, with boxing gloves in a well-lit arena, but a bare-knuckle brawl on a farm in Boston Corner almost 150 years ago.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Legislators consider limits on personal injury lawsuits

winstedjournal@sbcglobal.net

State legislators hoped to get judiciary committee approval this week for a bill that would limit personal injury lawsuits stemming from incidents at popular recreation areas.
HB 6557, An Act Concerning Liability for the Recreational Use of Lands, is a response to a personal injury lawsuit decided last year, in which a Rocky Hill woman was awarded $2.9 million after she broke her neck in a bicycle accident.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Wilson-Foley joins race for Congress

jenniferk@lakevillejournal.com

Entrepreneur Lisa Wilson-Foley has announced her candidacy for Congress in Connecticut’s 5th District.
Democrat Chris Murphy of Cheshire has held the seat since 2007. He has announced his intention to run for Joseph Lieberman’s seat in the U.S. Senate.
Wilson-Foley ran unsuccessfully for the Republican nomination for lieutenant governor in 2010. She lives in Simsbury with her husband, Brian, and their children.
Other Republicans who have announced for the seat are Justin Bernier of Plainville and Mark Greenberg of Litchfield.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Legislators consider limits on personal injury lawsuits

winstedjournal@sbcglobal.net

State legislators hoped to get judiciary committee approval this week for a bill that would limit personal injury lawsuits stemming from incidents at popular recreation areas.
HB 6557, An Act Concerning Liability for the Recreational Use of Lands, is a response to a personal injury lawsuit decided last year, in which a Rocky Hill woman was awarded $2.9 million after she broke her neck in a bicycle accident.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Three schools tops in green energy

karaw@lakevillejournal.com

Every year the Green Cup Challenge pits private schools across the country against each other to see which school can reduce energy consumption the most. The challenge is divided into regions, with the Northeast Boarding division by far the largest, with 41 schools participating. More than 100 schools took part across the country.
The Berkshire School, The Millbrook School, Salisbury School, South Kent School, The Hotchkiss School and Kent School competed this year, and three of them placed.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Why the Easter holiday is so late this year

karenb@lakevillejournal.com

Over the centuries, people around the world have found lots of things to squabble about — including “the celebration of God’s holy and supremely excellent day.”
That description of Easter was written by Epiphanius of Salamis not long after the First Council of Nicaea met in 325. There and then, it was decided that all Christian churches would celebrate Easter on the same day (whatever that day is); and that the complicated Hebrew calendar would no longer be factored in.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Fine time for chicks, lambs

It takes a big man to raise a tiny chicken. Antonio Razzaio of Scarsdale, N.Y., left, came to Tractor Supply in Amenia over the weekend to pick up a half dozen baby chicks, which he said he will raise for their eggs. Although his main residence is in Westchester, Razzaio said he also has property in Dutchess County.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Whassup?

Vivian, the Ag-Ed sow at Housatonic Valley Regional High School, took interest in something in the barn.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Who pays the most in property taxes?

christineb@millertonnews.com

WASHINGTON — Town of Washington residents asked at the comprehensive plan visioning meeting about taxes. In fact, based on an analysis by The Millerton News, town residents on average pay lower tax rates than in surrounding Dutchess County towns.
But that doesn’t mean that town of Washington residents have lower tax bills. The total estimated market value of Washington properties is high, four times that of Pine Plains, two-and-a-half times that of North East. As a result, Washington residents pay as much in county taxes as residents in Amenia, North East and Pine Plains combined.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.