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Globalization Is One Thing, Search for Redemption Is Another

Movies: ‘A Hologram for the King’

Adapting a novel into a movie can be tricky, and some novels are better suited for it than others.

The major reason is that you can put a book down and come back to it later. People will spend 20, 30, or 40 hours reading a novel. Most moviegoers, though, would prefer to spend a little less time than that in the theater.

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The Irascible Miles Davis, Not the Great Innovator

Movies: ‘Miles Ahead’
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

Don Cheadle’s “Miles Ahead,” about jazz legend and certified grouch Miles Davis, adds to the long list of pop music biopics that just don’t quite make it.

It’s not hagiography, like Oliver Stone’s “The Doors.” 

And it’s not a complete mess, like “Stoned,” about Rolling Stones founder Brian Jones.

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Absolutely Not Just for Kids

Movies: ‘The Jungle Book’

“The Jungle Book” is a collection of seven stories and 13 poems that was published in 1895. Most are set in India, although Rudyard Kipling wrote them, oddly enough, in Vermont. Three stories and one poem are about Mowgli, a young boy who got lost in the jungle and was raised by wolves.

One story and one poem involve a mongoose named Rikki-Tikki-Tavi. They’ve been published on their own, so you may be familiar with the name.

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So, Who Is the Victim Here?

Movies: ‘Eye in the Sky’

It is easy to concede that “Eye in the Sky” is a taut, well-made thriller about modern warfare, with an A-list, mostly British, cast. It would be a disservice to readers, however, to ignore the movie’s politics.

So at the risk of angering those whose views may not comport with mine, here goes: “Eye in the Sky” is the most shamefully manipulative, overtly propagandistic, and frankly dishonest film I have seen on the subject.

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Coming of Age, Late in Life

Movies: ‘Doris’

You may be familiar with Michael Showalter and his work in the comedy group The State, the comedy trio Stella or on the movie “Wet Hot American Summer” and its Netflix-series prequel. But if none of that means anything to you, don’t worry. “Hello, My Name Is Doris,” which Showalter co-wrote and directed, is a stand-alone piece, very different from the broad comedy he’s best known for.

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There Must Not Be a Number 3

Movies: ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2’
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

In “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” a bunch of Greek people have a wedding. Some of them are fat.

But some of them are not fat. So this could have been called “My Regular-Sized Greek Wedding” but if they did that there wouldn’t be a number at the end of the title.

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Colebrook General Store: Preservation Society raising funds

editor@winstedjournal.com

COLEBROOK — The Colebrook Preservation Society, a nonprofit organization that owns the Colebrook General Store at 559 Colebrook Road, is raising funds to rehabilitate the store building.
Originally, residents believed that the store building was constructed in 1812, which is the year that is above the front door of the building.
However, according to society member Tom Redington, Town Historian Bob Grigg recently discovered that the building was originally constructed in 1792.

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This Critic Gives It a Thumbs Up

Movies: ‘Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’

As a comic book fan, I became quite nervous when the reviews for “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” were released. On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has a dismal 29 percent rating — 190 of the 268 critics collected on the site gave it a thumbs down.  

And yet, on that very same site, audience members shared their own reviews. Guess what? Out of more than 167,000 moviegoers, 73 percent liked it.

Remembering, Slowly

Movies: ‘Remember’
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

In the slow-paced thriller “Remember,” Zev Guttman (Christopher Plummer) sets off from a nursing home to track down and kill the Nazi SS officer who killed his family at Auschwitz.

Zev has just lost his wife; his mind is starting to wander; and his friend Max (Martin Landau), who devises the scheme to find someone named Rudy Kurlander, is too ill to go himself.

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Wild, Wonderful And Entertaining With Great Gags

Movies: 'Zootopia'

Please hear me, reader: Disney’s “Zootopia” is a wonderful movie, a carnival of animals, a sumptuous, state-of-the-art, computer-animated film bursting with creativity and color. Moments for children alternate with moments for adults — in one scene rodent employees file out of Lemming Bros. Bank for lunch. Adults will chuckle; it will pass over kids’ heads.

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