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Salisbury

The top 30 students of the Salisbury-based tae kwon do team led by instructor Dylan Baker traveled to Holy Cross High School in Waterbury on Sunday, Oct. 1, for the 53rd annual Connecticut Yankee National Open Karate Tournament. Accompanying the young athletes were instructors Mike Thomas, James Murnane and Kirsten Haaland.

Competing against more than 250 other young martial arts practitioners, Baker’s team achieved top honors across the 150 age/rank divisions. They took home four fourth-place trophies, nine third-place, 25 second-place, 27 first-place and one Grand-Champion...

Salisbury

Visionary Computer The little Apple shop that keeps on growing reaches a new benchmark

LAKEVILLE — Visionary Computer, an Apple Computer Value Added Reseller and Premium Service Provider that has been an indispensable resource for Northwest Corner Mac users, is growing and expanding. 
After several months of construction, an extension of 1,800 square feet opened May 1 (following an opening party on April 29). The new wing more than doubles the store’s original 1,300 square feet.
The extension includes a sleek new showroom, designed according to Apple standards, and dedicated spaces for meeting  with clients.  

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Roadwork, a hidden roadway, lakeside tree cutting and transfer station update at Salisbury BOS meeting

SALISBURY — The Route 41/44 intersection project was delayed a bit due to problems with the 21 drains along that stretch of Route 44 in Lakeville, First Selectman Curtis Rand told the Board of Selectmen Monday, May 1.
Rand said the problems would be resolved shortly and the work would resume.
He cautioned, “It will be a fairly disruptive summer in Lakeville.”

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Trees, trout thriving at Lime Rock Park

LIME ROCK — “Don’t step on the flags,” said Tracy Brown to a group of students from Sharon Center School who were preparing to plant buttonbush along the banks of the Salmon Kill at Lime Rock Park.
“The flags are where we planted last year.”
Brown is the Northeastern Restoration Coordinator for Trout Unlimited. She has been busy the last few years on restoring trout habitat in the Salmon Kill, a major tributary of the Housatonic River.

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From another angle, why invasive plants are a menace

SALISBURY — Northwest Corner residents with an appetite for the outdoors probably already know that invasive plant species are one of this area’s top environmental threats.  But do they realize the other side: the reasons why native species are so valuable?
Elaine Hecht, chair of the Salisbury Association’s outreach and education committees, said that it’s impossible to pin down the benefits of native plant species to one particular function.

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Struggling to solve the refugee crisis

SALISBURY — The problem of refugees from war-torn countries is complicated and growing, according to Gordon Rupp, former head of the International Rescue Committee (IRC).
Rupp spoke at a Salisbury Forum on Friday, April 21, at Housatonic Valley Regional High School.
Using Syria as a timely example, he said that fully half of that country’s pre-civil war population of 21 million is displaced: with 7 million “internally displaced,” 4.5 million in neighboring countries, and 250,000 in Europe and the U.S.

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The new ambulance has arrived

SALISBURY — A gleaming new Ford 450 turbo diesel ambulance with all kinds of nifty features is in the Salisbury Volunteer Ambulance Service (SVAS) barn on Undermountain Road.
SVAS Chief Pat Barton provided a tour of the vehicle on Monday morning, April 17.
It’s a little longer and a little higher than the ambulance it is replacing, so the drivers will have to be aware of that, she said.

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Children’s garden ready to grow

Planning and design work are underway for a children’s garden at Bauer Park.
The park, at the north end of Factory Pond in Lakeville, will have flower beds, shrubs and pathways designed for instruction and enjoyment.
The Bauer Park project is the fourth undertaken by the Lakeville Community Conservancy, along with the garden at Cannon Park, a dozen large flower boxes around the village, and the garden in front of the Lakeville post office.

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Concerts and more in Salisbury

SALISBURY — The eighth-grade promotion exercise (aka graduation) at Salisbury Central School (SCS)will be Friday, June 16, 6:30 p.m.
Principal Lisa Carter also told the Salisbury school board that there will be no changes to the SCS schedule next year.
The board met Monday, April 24.
Tonight, Thursday, April 27, is the SCS spring band concert, at 6 p.m.

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Saving memories of World War I

SALISBURY —  It was on April 6, 1917, that the United States entered World War I, a date that most Americans probably don’t remember. 
The nation’s entry into World War II is a little easier to remember, sparked as it was by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. 

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Horace Holley’s impact on academia

SALISBURY — Horace Holley was mentioned in letters by U.S. presidents. He was a prominent clergyman in Boston, and he was the major figure in American higher education in the pre-Civil War American West.
“He was the most significantly insignificant person in American history,” declared James P. Cousins, professor of history at Western Michigan University and author of “Horace Holley: Transylvania University and the Making of Liberal Education in the Early American Republic.”

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