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Salisbury

SALISBURY — Salisbury First Selectman Curtis Rand said the town can put up “no parking signs” around the Great Falls in the Amesville section of town to discourage visitors from going into the falls.

Rand was responding to Amesville resident Jeremy Dakin’s comments about the July 30 fatality at the falls, at the regular monthly meeting of the Salisbury Board of Selectmen on Monday, Aug. 5.

First Light, the company that operates the Falls Village hydroelectric facility, is the owner of the land around the falls, and of the boat launch and park on...

Salisbury

Investigation finds strong, credible evidence of abuse

SALISBURY — A report on allegations of sexual misconduct by former Salisbury Recreation Director Art Wilkinson concluded that “the people making allegations of abuse are credible, and that Arthur Wilkinson’s denials are not credible.”

The Salisbury Board of Selectmen, at a special meeting Wednesday, April 10, made public the report from attorneys Thomas J. Murphy and James J. Healy of Cowdery and Murphy LLC. The selectmen voted to publish the report, in its entirety, on the town website.

Hope and cool science at Maker Faire

LAKEVILLE — Creativity and innovation were on show at The Hotchkiss School on Sunday, April 7, for the fourth annual Tri-State Mini Maker Faire.
What is a Maker Faire? It feels a bit like a science fair, but for adults. People present their hobbies, inventions and crafts to the public in a fun and interactive way. 

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Practical ways to help immigrants

LIME ROCK — A crowd of about 50 people came to Trinity Lime Rock Episcopal Church Saturday, April 6, for “Unshackling Dreams of America: Supporting Asylum Seekers and Other Immigrants.”
The event was organized by Vecinos Seguros. Director John Carter made brief opening remarks and introduced Elizabeth Augustin of Amenia.

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Harbinger of spring: Ice is out

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Salisbury budget hearing is April 8

SALISBURY — The Salisbury Board of Finance voted on Tuesday, March 26, to send the budget proposals from the town Board of Education and the Board of Selectmen to public hearing.
The public hearing is Monday, April 8, 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall. The budget year begins July 1.
The Board of Education presented a slimmed-down version of its initial proposal. The spending plan for Salisbury Central School calls for $5,678,153, an increase of $129,965 (2.34 percent)

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Groundbreaking for new transfer station

SALISBURY — Salisbury First Selectman Curtis Rand said that work at the Salisbury-Sharon transfer station officially begins this week. He made the announcement at the regular April meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Monday, April 1.
Rand and Selectman Chris Williams attended the meeting. 
Rand said the contractor will begin bringing trailers, offices and equipment to the Millerton Road site this week. 
The goal is to have the new facility built by December.

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Double decker

She’s not sure why but Elvia Gignoux of Weatogue Farm in Salisbury said  it’s not uncommon for the new lambs to stand on their mothers. “Maybe for warmth?” she surmised. “It seems that certain mothers are more tolerant. This mother (Chanel) is always happy to have them sit or stand on her.” Whatever the reason, it’s undeniably adorable.

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From walls of necessity to walls of human engineering

SALISBURY — David Frye, professor of history at Eastern Connecticut State University and author of the recently published “Walls: A History of Civilization in Blood and Brick,” said he did not set out to write a political book, and backed it up by not talking about politics — at least, not contemporary politics.
Frye spoke at Noble Horizons on Saturday, March 30.
He said the effort that eventually produced “Walls” began as he considered the idea of civilization vs. outsiders.

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Be ready for still more bears rifling trash

SALISBURY — Black bears are back in Connecticut, Paul Rego from the Wildlife Division of the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) told a standing-room only crowd at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday afternoon, March 30.
That’s not news for most Northwest Corner residents. But what is more suprising is that the heaviest population of the ursines is not in this part of the state. 
Yes, they like the woods

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Song and story night at Scoville

SALISBURY — Danny Tieger sang songs with toddlers and pre-schoolers on Thursday, March 21, at a family literacy night at the Scoville Memorial Library. More  than 50 people attended the event, which was hosted by Housatonic Child Care Center and funded by the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation. After pizza was served, librarian Molly Salisbury read “Whistle for Willy,” by Ezra Jack Keats. Each child received a copy of the book to take home.

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