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Salisbury

SALISBURY — Salisbury residents voted to appropriate $2.25 million, to be raised through the issuing of bonds, for renovations and improvements to Salisbury Central School at a town meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 9. The meeting was called to order at 7:31 p.m. and adjourned at 7:43 p.m.

After Emily Vail was chosen as moderator and Town Clerk Patty Williams read the call, Mike Clulow took the podium to provide some background on the issue at hand. He is the chairman of the Salisbury Central School Building Committee and is a member of the Board of Finance.

About a year ago...

Salisbury

Magyar new principal at SCS

SALISBURY — The Salisbury Central School Board of Education hired a new principal at its meeting on Monday, May 22. 
Stephanie L. Magyar, 36, was the unanimous choice of the principal search committee and of the Board of Education. 
She is a graduate of Salisbury Central School (class of 1994) and Housatonic Valley Regional High School (class of 1998). 

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Largest showing ever for Blue and Gold at the White

SALISBURY — Abigail Johnson won Best in Show for her sculpture, “Hanging On,” at The Blue and Gold at The White art show on Friday evening, May 19. 
Members of the community were invited to The White Gallery in Lakeville to see the exhibit of pieces by Housatonic Valley Regional High School (HVRHS) students. The exhibit ran from Friday, May 19, to Sunday, May 21.

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Market expected to keep growing through season

SALISBURY — Lawrence Davis-Hollander of the Scoville Memorial Library checked in with Skip Hobbs of Mountain Falls Farm in Sheffield, Mass., a little before 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 20.
Hobbs was one of four vendors at the first Salisbury farmer’s market at the library, along with Crooked Oak Farm (Lakeville), Whippoorwill Farm (Lakeville) and Carol Bonci of Sharon.
Davis-Hollander asked Hobbs how the morning went.
“I really don’t have anything to compare it to,” said Hobbs, who seemed pleased, nonetheless.

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P&Z approves plans for Lakeville Journal building

SALISBURY — The Salisbury Planning and Zoning Commission voted unanimously on Monday, May 22, to approve a site plan for a new use of The Lakeville Journal Co. building at 33 and 34 Bissell St. in Lakeville.
George Johanneson from Allied Engineering spoke for Salisbury Bank and Trust, which is in negotiations to buy the building. He told the commission that the plan is to demolish the metal building in the rear (which once housed the company’s printing press) and build a two-story structure on the same foundation and slab.

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Concerns about clearing of trees on lake shore

SALISBURY — At the annual meeting of the Lake Wononscopomuc Association on Saturday, June 3, members will discuss a current land use controversy and consider what steps to take to avoid problems in the future.
The Conservation Commission has issued a “Cease and Correct” order to Quentin Van Doosselaere for land-clearing activity at 209 Sharon Road, on the lake, earlier this year.
The association will consider whether it should hire an attorney to study the regulations that protect the lakes in town.

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Rise in mill rate expected

SALISBURY — At town meeting, voters approved the 2017-18 budget proposals from the Salisbury Board of Selectmen and Board of Education.
The votes at the Wednesday, May 10, town meeting were unanimous, 26-0.
The budget vote was done by paper ballot. Four routine administrative matters were swiftly approved by voice vote, also unanimous.
Charlie Vail was the moderator.
Town government spending will be $6,422,733, an increase of $274,740 (4.47 percent).

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Why it doesn’t make sense to have a perfect lawn

SALISBURY — Humans have degraded 60 percent of the earth’s ecosystems, said Douglas Tallamy, professor of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware, speaking at a Salisbury Forum event at The Hotchkiss School on Friday, May 12.
He offered specific remedies — in particular, rethinking how we look at our landscapes.

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Welcoming and comforting all walks of life

SALISBURY — The Rev. Aaron Miller of Metropolitan Community Church in Hartford said that transgender people are particularly vulnerable to attempting suicide and to being verbally or sexually assaulted.
“Pastors and congregants may be the only people to offer unconditional love” in such cases.
Miller spoke at the Salisbury Congregational Church on Sunday, May 14, as part of the Peace Through Understanding series of talks.

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Unearthing, preserving mementos of the Great War

SALISBURY — Ghosts walk the streets of this historic town, and mingle comfortably with the living. History isn’t history here; it’s part of today, every day. Evidence of this was (again) abundant at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday, May 13, as a steady flow of people brought in old photos, medals, trench art and more to contribute to the state’s database of World War I mementos.

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See the church, see the steeple

SALISBURY — Recently a St. John’s Episcopal Church parishioner came out of the Salisbury Pharmacy, looked over at the church, and noticed the steeple seemed a little off-kilter.
He changed vantage points and looked some more.
He wasn’t imagining things. The steeple was definitely crooked.
He notified Father David Sellery, who got the ball rolling.

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