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SALISBURY — The annual National Day of Prayer on Thursday, May 3, was observed in several area towns; in Salisbury the ceremony was at the Congregational Church.

Barbara Schoenly opened with a remark from Abraham Lincoln, about faith:

“I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.”

“America is broken,” continued Shoenly. “Discord is undeniable, and unity is missing.

“America needs God now more than any time in our generation.”

Lillian Wang, a...

Salisbury

State Supreme Court reverses lower court’s school funds ruling

SALISBURY — The state Supreme Court overturned a lower court decision on Connecticut’s funding of education on Wednesday, Jan. 17, effectively turning the issue back to the Connecticut General Assembly, which convenes on Feb. 7.
In September 2016, Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher ruled that the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF) did not demonstrate that public schools in the state were in violation of the state constitution in terms of funding or adequacy of instruction.

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At Clermont, a historical house as it looked in its heyday

SALISBURY — One of the unique features of the Clermont State Historic Site is that the home of the powerful and influential Livingston family is very much as it was during the life of John Henry Livingston, his wife, Alice, and their daughters, Honoria and Janet, in the early part of the 20th century.

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What changes will 2018 bring to Salisbury?

SALISBURY — Salisbury First Selectman Curtis Rand identified the top priorities for the Board of Selectmen in 2018 at the regular monthly meeting on Monday, Jan. 8.
The top six priorities are: the 2018-19 budget, the new transfer station, a new building for the Salisbury Winter Sports Association at Satre Hill, fixing the steps at Town Hall, some operational improvements in the town’s water and sewer system, and finishing the paving of Twin Lakes Road.

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Women, men and children rose to protest on Saturday

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The heart of protecting free speech

SALISBURY — Law professor Nadine Strossen and federal Judge William F. Kuntz covered free speech, censorship and related issues in a freewheeling discussion at Noble Horizons on Sunday, Jan. 21.
Strossen was president of the American Civil Liberties Union from 1991 to 2008. Kuntz is a United States District Court judge, appointed in 2011.
And if the discussion seemed to be friendly and informal, it’s because the two met 40-odd years ago at Harvard Law School.
“May I call you Bill?” said Strossen as they got started.

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Salisbury School teacher seeking help with photo IDs

SALISBURY  — When my wife, Danielle Mailer, and I purchased a small home on Farnam Road in Lakeville, we had no idea that we would find a cache of photos of previous owners of the home going back to the 1930s. This was the Fowlkes family, one of several black families who made a life here in this small, mostly white rural Connecticut town.

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Saturday morning cartoons, Salisbury-style

SALISBURY — Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton provided instruments and inspiration. A group of small children provided the enthusiasm. The result was highly entertaining.
It was Saturday morning, Jan. 13, at the Scoville Memorial Library. Sosin and Seaton, who make a specialty of providing musical accompaniment for silent movies, brought a wide variety of mostly percussion instruments for the children to use, plus Sosin’s electric piano.
Many of the instruments were decidedly ordinary – child’s blocks, inexpensive whistles and bells, kazoos.

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Then it got weird at Scoville Library …

SALISBURY — Matthew Deady, chair of the physics department at Bard College, told an audience at the Scoville Memorial Library that physicists are looking at new ways of explaining the universe. Deady spoke at the library Thursday, Jan. 11.
He said that 20th-century physics does a good job of explaining things, and verifying its conclusions through experimentation. But when scientists confront questions that are on “the edge of experience,” the process starts to break down.

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Stephanie Baldwin is the new SVNA clinical director

SALISBURY — Serving 12 communities within northwestern Connecticut since 1904, the Salisbury Visiting Nurse Association (SVNA) recently promoted from within their organization by naming Stephanie Baldwin, RN, as their new Clinical Director.
“We are here as a support to keep people well,” Baldwin said, emphasizing interest in “getting people back to a state of wellness where they don’t need the services of the SVNA any longer.” 

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How to keep speech free and robust

SALISBURY — Nadine Strossen, former president of the American Civil Liberties Union, and United States District Court Judge William F. Kuntz will discuss  Strossen’s new book, “Hate: Why We Should Resist It with Free Speech, Not Censorship,” at Noble Horizons on Sunday, Jan. 21, at 2 p.m.
In a phone interview on Thursday, Jan. 4, Strossen was asked to define “hate speech.”
“There are dozens of definitions,” she said. “They’ve been labored over by governments, international bodies, colleges.”

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