Login

Salisbury

SALISBURY — Voters unanimously approved the 2018-19 municipal and school budgets in Salisbury at a town meeting on Wednesday, May 9.

By a vote of 34-0, the town meeting approved total expenditures of $15,673,016, for town government, Salisbury Central School and the town’s share of the Region One budget.

The town government budget for 2018-19 is $6,609,060, an increase of $186,327 (2.9 percent).

The Salisbury Central School budget is $5,548,188, an increase of $126,402 (2.33 percent).

The town’s share of the Region One budget is $3,515,175...

Salisbury

Something fishy

Aiden Cherniske, 12,  traveled to Salisbury from his hometown in Kent for a day of ice fishing, and caught a 4.5-pound large-mouth bass.  

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Filling big shoes, Bill Pond arrives at Noble Horizons in Lakeville

SALISBURY — Bill Pond joined Noble Horizons as its new administrator on Monday, Jan. 8, and promptly caught the flu that has been circulating around the Northwest Corner. 
He’s back on the Salisbury campus now, however, and is excited by the challenges that face him as he steps into the spot recently vacated by longtime and beloved Administrator Eileen Mulligan.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

State Supreme Court reverses lower court’s school funds ruling

SALISBURY — The state Supreme Court overturned a lower court decision on Connecticut’s funding of education on Wednesday, Jan. 17, effectively turning the issue back to the Connecticut General Assembly, which convenes on Feb. 7.
In September 2016, Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher ruled that the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF) did not demonstrate that public schools in the state were in violation of the state constitution in terms of funding or adequacy of instruction.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

At Clermont, a historical house as it looked in its heyday

SALISBURY — One of the unique features of the Clermont State Historic Site is that the home of the powerful and influential Livingston family is very much as it was during the life of John Henry Livingston, his wife, Alice, and their daughters, Honoria and Janet, in the early part of the 20th century.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

What changes will 2018 bring to Salisbury?

SALISBURY — Salisbury First Selectman Curtis Rand identified the top priorities for the Board of Selectmen in 2018 at the regular monthly meeting on Monday, Jan. 8.
The top six priorities are: the 2018-19 budget, the new transfer station, a new building for the Salisbury Winter Sports Association at Satre Hill, fixing the steps at Town Hall, some operational improvements in the town’s water and sewer system, and finishing the paving of Twin Lakes Road.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Women, men and children rose to protest on Saturday

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The heart of protecting free speech

SALISBURY — Law professor Nadine Strossen and federal Judge William F. Kuntz covered free speech, censorship and related issues in a freewheeling discussion at Noble Horizons on Sunday, Jan. 21.
Strossen was president of the American Civil Liberties Union from 1991 to 2008. Kuntz is a United States District Court judge, appointed in 2011.
And if the discussion seemed to be friendly and informal, it’s because the two met 40-odd years ago at Harvard Law School.
“May I call you Bill?” said Strossen as they got started.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Salisbury School teacher seeking help with photo IDs

SALISBURY  — When my wife, Danielle Mailer, and I purchased a small home on Farnam Road in Lakeville, we had no idea that we would find a cache of photos of previous owners of the home going back to the 1930s. This was the Fowlkes family, one of several black families who made a life here in this small, mostly white rural Connecticut town.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Saturday morning cartoons, Salisbury-style

SALISBURY — Donald Sosin and Joanna Seaton provided instruments and inspiration. A group of small children provided the enthusiasm. The result was highly entertaining.
It was Saturday morning, Jan. 13, at the Scoville Memorial Library. Sosin and Seaton, who make a specialty of providing musical accompaniment for silent movies, brought a wide variety of mostly percussion instruments for the children to use, plus Sosin’s electric piano.
Many of the instruments were decidedly ordinary – child’s blocks, inexpensive whistles and bells, kazoos.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Then it got weird at Scoville Library …

SALISBURY — Matthew Deady, chair of the physics department at Bard College, told an audience at the Scoville Memorial Library that physicists are looking at new ways of explaining the universe. Deady spoke at the library Thursday, Jan. 11.
He said that 20th-century physics does a good job of explaining things, and verifying its conclusions through experimentation. But when scientists confront questions that are on “the edge of experience,” the process starts to break down.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.