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Salisbury

SALISBURY — A 1.3 mile stretch of Taconic Road in Salisbury is now a little cleaner, after a team headed by Jean Saliter spent a few hours on Saturday, April 21, picking up trash.

The occasion was Earth Day (which was on Sunday, April 22). 

The participants were Saliter, Digby Brown, state Rep. Brian Ohler (R-64) and a surprise guest: state Sen. Craig Miner (R-30), looking especially rustic.

Miner, who lives in Litchfield, got a head start on the others, with a couple of tires he spotted on the way to Salisbury.

With trash bags and picker-uppers,...

Salisbury

Rain, rain and Rice on agenda for BOS

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The process of rebuilding the Long Pond dam is underway, despite the recent inordinately wet weather, according to First Selectman Curtis Rand.
Rand reported on dam progress at the monthly meeting of the Board of Selectmen Tuesday, Sept. 6.
A temporary or “coffer” dam  is now in place to keep water in the pond while excavation and rebuilding goes on below.

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What everyone needs to know about the Amazon

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Ethnobotanist and author Mark J. Plotkin speaks on “Rainforest Conservation and the Search for New Jungle Medicines” on Friday, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m. at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville as part of the Salisbury Forum series.
“Are you interested in clean air? Are you interested in medicines when you’re sick? Are you interested in biodegradable pesticides or organic fertilizers?” asked Plotkin in a brief telephone interview Monday, Sept. 12.
“Then you are interested and have a stake in the preservation of the Amazon.”

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Bank will loan to small businesses

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Salisbury Bank and Trust (SBT) has $16 million available for loans to small businesses.

The bank announced Aug. 25 that it had sold $16 million worth of preferred stock to the U.S. Treasury under the Small Business Lending Fund program, a fund of $30 billion established by the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010.

The idea behind the law is to encourage lending to small businesses by providing access to capital for community banks with assets under $10 billion. (In the world of finance, such a bank is considered “small.”)

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New wheels, new freedom for veteran

publisher@lakevillejournal.com

LIME ROCK — America’s love affair with trucks goes a long way back, and it’s not fading anytime soon. Some proof of that is a new life being given to a 1939 Dodge truck nicknamed “Ducky,” which is undergoing a transformation at Northwest Corner Classic Cars so it can become roadworthy for its owner, William “Willy” Paschal of Middlefield, Mass.
He admittedly fell for Ducky the minute he saw it.
“I wanted a hot rod,” he said. “I knew as soon as I saw this truck, I had to have it. As everybody says who sees it, it’s unique.”

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Tax collector moves on

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — Denise Rice, who began working as Salisbury’s tax collector in 1973, remembers the summer of 1985 very well.
That was the year of the Town Hall fire, which occurred in August. This was also the pre-computer age, when small-town record keeping was done by hand.
“Our office was on the second floor,” said Rice. “It ended up in the basement.”
Rice was in a reminiscing mood Friday, Sept. 2 — her last day on the job, after 38 years.
She recalled that the tax records had to be reconstructed, using deposit slips from Salisbury Bank and Trust, one account at a time.

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Leaping obstacles with the help of polo ponies

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Brandon Rease, age 16, was working with Billy, who is a polo pony.
The word “pony” is misleading. Billy, a full-sized horse who used to race, had Billy running around a circular enclosure at the Gomez farm on Wells Hill Road last week.
The goal was to remind Billy that “I am in control,” Brandon said. “When I want him to do something, he does it.”
The horse was jogging along counter-clockwise. At a word from Brandon, Billy turned on a dime and went back in the other direction.

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Fact or fiction?

Discovering the real story of ‘The Help’
tarak@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — Anyone who has read “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett, or has seen the new movie version will no doubt wonder how much of the story is true.
Set in Jackson, Miss., during the early 1960s, it chronicles to some degree the growth of the civil rights movement, through the lens of the upper-class white women in the town and the black maids who serve them and care for them and their families.

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Duplicate bridge results reported

LAKEVILLE — The weekly duplicate bridge game on Aug. 17 was at the Interlaken Inn in Lakeville. Following a delicious lunch, we had nine full tables. We played three boards a round so all pairs played 27 boards. The average score was 108.
For North South pairs, in first with133.5 points (61.81 percent) were Muriel Rothstein and her daughter, Gail Gamble; in second with 128 points (59.26 percent) were Emily and Billy Saster; in third with 125.5 points (58.1percent) were Wendy Summer and Harry Hall.

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Repairs and classic muscle cars

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

LIME ROCK — Northwest Classic Cars is not your typical used car shop. For starters, the showroom sits right across the street from Lime Rock Park, making it very convenient for race fans to stop by between heats.
“I may not get a lot of business from people who walk in from the track, but I get a lot of word of mouth referrals from it,” said owner Christopher Little. “People come in and see the type of operation we run, the mechanical skills Rick [the maintenance manager] has and all the equipment we have, the quality of cars we have, they spread the word.”

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Quarry Hill Farm Arabians on view

tarak@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — According to www.arabhorse.com, the Arabian Horse Network website, there are only two Arabian breeding farms in Connecticut, two in New York state and none in Massachusetts. In a region thick with equines this may seem a little surprising. But while the Arabian horse may be for many iconic — think flowing mane and tail, flared nostrils, high-stepping gait — its popularity as an all-round equine partner is still building.

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