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Kent

KENT — The Board of Education held its first regular monthly meeting of the 2017-18 school year at Kent Center School (KCS) on Wednesday, Sept. 6.

Several teachers attended the meeting to voice concerns to the board about the implementation of new grading practices at KCS. A major change would be the elimination of percentages as grades, replacing all numbers with the letters A, B, C or NYP (not yet proficient).    

Fourth-grade teacher Michelle Mott explained that, last year, a few classes piloted some of the aspects of the new grading practices with the...

Kent

For pharmacy, new home in a historic railroad building

More than a year has passed since the Kent Station Pharmacy moved to its new location, in the former train station at 38 N. Main St. 
Owner and pharmacist Peter D’Aprile purchased the landmark historic building and, following renovations, opened for business there on Oct. 26, 2015. 
“The move went great. We really didn’t run into any issues,” he said.

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How Kent grew from a ‘howling wilderness’ to a modern community

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

KENT — This year, the Kent Historical Society sets out to answer the ambitious question of what Kent is and how it got that way. The 2017 exhibition will be called The Founding Fathers but, as the first in a series of lectures on the subject demonstrated, the survey will be less focused on individuals and more focused on the many influences that came to play as the town grew from a “howling wilderness” to a well-heeled Litchfield County town.

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‘Bundles of enthusiasm’ in Kent on day of protest march

KENT — What started as a few women deciding to walk on Jan. 21, because they were unable to travel to marches in larger cities, grew into a mass of about 200 women, men, children and dogs who marched from Kent Town Hall to the Civil War Monument and back. 
People showed up with handmade signs, pink hats, T-shirts with logos and bundles of enthusiasm. 

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Town report, finances at town meeting

KENT — The history of the New England town meeting dates back to Colonial times. The centuries-old tradition continued on Thursday evening, Jan. 19, when First Selectman Bruce Adams called the annual town meeting to order.  

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Around the corner, the little cottage of wellness

KENT — “We moved everything into here over the course of a week in November — but isn’t it charming?” Kelly Thurston said, standing in the new Village Herbalist shop on Old Barn Road, where she is the manager. 
An offshoot of The Village Herbalist, which opened in 2011 in Millerton, the Kent location, which Thurston described as “the boutique version,” is built like a miniature barn and lit with the champagne glow of warm holiday lights. 

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The inside scoop on private school admissions

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Year in Review 2016: Town center began transformation, improvement

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

KENT — Some towns talk about improving their village centers as a way to promote economic development. Kent didn’t spend a lot of time talking about it; the town just got to work. Sleeves got rolled up, rolling steel moved in and the project got under way. 

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Kent holiday parade lights up the night

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

KENT — Dreams of white Christmas  were illuminated on a gray Sunday, Dec. 18, as fire companies and other owners of large vehicles turned out for the annual Parade of Lights.
The holiday spirit prevailed despite a chilling 37-degree temperature, and a lively caravan of festively bedecked trucks trundled from the Green to the firehouse. 
Once there, parade goers and parade drivers mingled and chatted over cookies and beverages.

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Old meets new as antiques shop shifts location

KENT— After 21 years in the same location, Sue Edgerly and Merle Koblenz have recently reopened Main Street Antiques in a new location, at 31 Main St.
The building in which they were formerly located was going through extensive renovation, which led them to a search for a new site. Their hunt was successful, and the new space is much larger, noted Koblenz, “a comfortable space, light and bright with plenty of room for display.”

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Merry (and elegant) for the holidays

KENT —Shopping at Scott & Bowne is a bit like visiting an eccentric, well-traveled great-grandparent — if one were allowed to pick up and inspect all that caught the eye, and if everything that took one’s fancy were for sale. This is a shop whose inventory is an eclectic, ever-changing collection of fine arts and furnishings, from silver to 19th-century photo albums to statues, as well as curios from around the world. A wide range of prices and historical eras are represented.

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