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Falls Village

Logan Riley, an eighth-grader at the Lee H. Kellogg School, is a semifinalist, eligible to compete in the 2017 Connecticut National Geographic State Bee, which will be held at Central Connecticut State University on Friday, March 31.

This is the second level of the National Geographic Bee competition. Bees were held throughout the state to determine each school champion. School champions then took a qualifying test, which they submitted to the National Geographic Society. The top-scoring students compete in the state bees in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia,...

Falls Village

Teachers question new scheduling plan

Teachers at Housatonic Valley Regional High School (HVRHS) expressed concern about the new schedule for the 2017-18 academic year during the Region One Board of Education meeting Monday, Feb. 6.
The new schedule is a semester schedule with longer class periods. Classes meet every day.
The existing schedule is a “rotating” schedule, and courses “drop off” every four days.

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Secrets hidden in the Great Mountain Forest tell tales of days gone by

After tramping through the snowy woods on a bright winter afternoon, Saturday, Feb. 3, a group of hikers relaxed at a camp fire and had tea.
The hike through a section of the Great Mountain Forest (GMF), looking primarily at evidence of iron industry activity and the effects on the forest, was led by Jody Bronson, GMF’s forester, with scientists Charlie Canham, Bob Marra and Tom Stansfield.
There was a modest amount of snow, and ice underneath it. The hikers wore traction devices such as YaxTrax on their boots to avoid untimely slips.

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Covered Bridge repairs planned for 2018

Representatives from the state Department of Transportation (DOT) previewed plans for repair of the historic 19th-century covered bridge over the Housatonic River on Feb. 2.  

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Creating a kinder world, one etiquette class at a time

As part of EdAdvance, one of Connecticut’s Regional Education Services that sponsors continuing and adult education courses, Housatonic Valley Regional High School will welcome Karen Thomas, a certified expert in courtesy, conduct and conversation. She will share her mastery of manners in two courses this spring: “Advanced Business Decorum” will be offered in March and “Dining Debonair” in April.

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The new grading system, explained

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

 
Parents of students at the Lee H. Kellogg School (LHK) — and the other schools in the region — can expect to see some changes in how their children are assessed and how those assessments are reported.
At a meeting for parents at the school Thursday, Jan. 26, LHK Principal Jennifer Law and a group of teachers explained the changes to a group of seven parents.

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A new way to teach children in Region One

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

FALLS VILLAGE — Region One Assistant Superintendent Pam Vogel said the shift to new grading practices in Region One will emphasize mastery of subjects rather than day-to-day activities.
Vogel took a few minutes to chat with The Lakeville Journal on Friday, Jan. 20.
She said there is a nationwide problem of students leaving high school unprepared for college or a career, to the point where many colleges and universities must offer remedial instruction in basic subjects.

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Rich world captured in show at D.M. Hunt

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

FALLS VILLAGE — Sarah Martinez showed a visitor her new art studio on Sunday, Jan. 15. Most of the lights had yet to be installed, but on a relatively sunny afternoon, the space was nice and airy and bright.
Martinez, who lives in an iconic stone house in the village with her husband, Brook (who is the music teacher at the Lee H. Kellogg School), and two small children, said she outgrew the room she was using in the house.

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Number one!

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Stage abuzz for ‘Drowsy Chaperone’

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

FALLS VILLAGE — Rehearsals are underway for the Housatonic Musical Theatre Society’s production of “The Drowsy Chaperone.”
The show stars Griffin Harney as “Man in Chair.” The star described the character: “He’s obsessed with old musical theater.”
Harney and co-directors Lori Belter and Michael Berkeley worked on the opening scene on Friday afternoon, Jan. 13, at Housatonic Valley Regional High School (HVRHS).

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2016 real estate market: Highs and lows in sales

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

The real estate market had unexpected highs and lows, according to area brokers, but it was generally strong. And they all are looking forward to what Graham Klemm of Klemm Real Estate called “a robust 2017.”

“In the build-up to the election there was a lot of anxiety,” he said. “Election years are never great for real estate. But the stock market was strong and interest rates were low in 2016; and the stock market is even stronger and interest rates are still low, so the foundation is very good for a robust 2017.”

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