Login

Books

It’s OK To Drop a Book in the Tub. But a Kindle? Not So Good.

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I like books, and I don’t own a Kindle. I’ve seen ’em, and they’re not for me.
For starters, good luck with your e-book thingy in the bathtub. I do some of my best reading a-soak, and I can’t imagine a steady regimen of warm, wet air is good for the gizmo.
Plus what if I drop it? A mass-market paperback can survive a dunking. In fact, it adds character to the volume.
My main objection to the e-book is more fundamental: I want to read a book, not a screen. If I want a screen, I’ll go to the computer or turn on the tube.
Harrumph.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Looking Back

Books: ‘The Journal of Judge Donald Warner’

As we move about Salisbury we often note symbols of the past — the Academy Building, the library, the churches — and think about life in a bygone era. A newly published book, “The Journal of Judge Donald Warner,” supplies many fascinating stories of that time, an insider’s view of the town’s special heritage.
Warner began his journal in 1926. Now, with its publication by the Salisbury Association Historical Society, all who love the town can share this splendid description of places and people.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Getting to Know Inspector Morse

About books from our area libraries
leong@lakevillejournal.com

If you know Inspector Morse only from the late John Thaw’s splendid impersonation in the BBC series shown on PBS over many seasons, you are missing the treat of reading Colin Dexter’s literate, clever novels on which the series was based.
Dexter, now 80, graduated in 1953 from Cambridge (“a city that embraced its river just as Oxford turned away from its”), taught for a decade in a lesser public (private to us) school and then in 1966 moved to Oxford’s local examination board (an organization that creates many of the United Kingdom’s standardized tests) because of increasing deafness.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Word About Horses, Many More Words About the Author

Books: Roxanne Bok’s ‘Horsekeeping’
tarak@lakevillejournal.com

Any book with the word horse in the title and a picture of an equine on the cover is bound to get my attention. It is a little bit difficult, however, to know what to make of “Horsekeeping,” a book recently published by Roxanne Bok.
It turns out the book is not a how-to manual. Rather it is a memoir; a slice of the author’s life, filled with stories from her childhood, reflections on parenting and marriage and descriptions of a somewhat gilded life, lived part-time in the country.
That is where the horse-keeping comes in.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Publishers Put Clamps on Library Patrons’ E-book Access

Books

When Amazon recently announced it would allow Kindle users to check out e-books at public libraries, something Nook and Sony reader owners have been able to do for some time, local Kindle readers must have been delighted to think hundreds of titles would finally be available to them at no cost.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Books

Robert Kipniss will read from his book, “A Working Artist’s Life,” at a reception and book signing hosted by Susan and Tino Galluzzo and Dan Dwyer at The White Gallery in Lakeville, Oct. 1, from 5 to 7 p.m. For information, call 860-435-1029.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Making History Live and Breathe

Books
jenniferk@lakevillejournal.com

The first thing you notice about Jennifer Donnelly is her passion. Whether you’re reading one of her novels or talking to her about them, expect the experience to be intense.
Donnelly, who lives in the Hudson Valley, will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck, NY, Saturday, Aug. 20, at 7:30 p.m. to read from her most recent novel, “The Wild Rose.” The book is the third in a series about an English family in 1914 London.
Another thing her books all have in common is their historical backdrop.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Love, War And Literature

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Among the writers coming to the annual Hotchkiss Library book signing in Sharon this Friday is Deb Olin Unferth — just Deb Olin back in 1987 when she showed her parents what’s what, quit college and ran away to foment revolution in Central America with her boyfriend.
George was a strange boyfriend, not always there, but there enough to keep Olin bound to him and to this restless, sometimes dangerous and often demoralizing adventure.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Stranger Than Fiction, and More Rewarding

Books
leong@lakevillejournal.com

When St. John’s Episcopal Church held its annual book sale last fall during Salisbury’s Fall Festival, organizers unexpectedly found themselves in the unique ­— and dazzling — world of rare books.
While sorting volumes in a box of ordinary contributions, Gaile Binzen noticed a pair of slipcases, each containing a Lewis Carroll book “prettily bound” in leather.
Perhaps they were worth more than the usual five dollars, and probably Dan Dwyer, owner of Johnnycake Books, would know.
And so opened a mystery and a “once-in-a-lifetime” experience for both Dwyer and St. John’s.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

E-ternally Yours, More or Less

Books

It turns out that a love of reading seems to require an inevitable fondness for real estate. Face it: If you love books, you want to own them. It’s just part of the experience of knowing a book. It’s as predictable as toast making crumbs.
And owning books, my friends, takes space. Real estate. It even explains the abandoned, book-filled trailer my husband discovered in a field one day. He found it odd.
OK, he found it really weird.
I, however, needed no explanation. My only question was what was going to happen to all those books?

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.