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Art

All About Transcendence

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

It begins as corrugated board and ends as sculpture. Henry Klimowicz takes the board from what he calls its “base moment” and gives it form in muscular, organic pieces that are strong, evocative and surprisingly beautiful. Now a cross section of his newer work is on exhibition at the Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery in a dramatic, eye-opening show.

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A Show of Color and Depth

leong@lakevillejournal.com

Color is what grabs you in Tina Chandler’s charming solo art show at Sharon’s Hotchkiss Library.
Chandler paints with pastel sticks made from pure pigment and a neutral binder: an arsenal of intense, vivid colors that result in pictures of immediate intensity. There is both simplicity and honesty in these pieces, as well as a child-like appreciation of the joy of color.

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Many Means to Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Through The White Gallery’s front windows you see the dress: white satin skirt, blue bodice, tiny Pippa Middleton buttons running down the back. Kate DeAngelis, who works in the White’s Great Barrington gallery and studied costume design, has now turned her talent to fashion. And the White’s Tino Galuzzo wants everyone to share his enthusiasm for her work.

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Bob Dylan’s Start

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Bob Dylan was only 19 when he arrived in New York City. He wanted to be a folk singer and songwriter like Carolyn Hester, Joan Baez, Pete Seeger and others whose clear-voiced songs recalled American innocence and optimism. Yet within two years his nasal, whiny voice and symbolist lyrics would rally activists protesting racial segregation and the Vietnam War. He would even be onstage with Martin Luther King for the “I Have a Dream” speech.

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A Rush to Lavish Color

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Leonore Gimpert, a Midwesterner, spends her winters on the Dutch side of St. Martin in the Caribbean. Perhaps that is why she began painting the lush, voluptuous, thickly layered, impasto pictures of flowers now on exhibit in Judith Singelis’s new show, “Lavish,” at Argazzi Art.

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The Beauty of Islam’s Worlds

Art: Scene: Islamic Art at the Met
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The Metropolitan Museum’s magnificent collection of Islamic art was, until recently, displayed as objects from a single religious culture that had swept across borders to claim nearly 25 percent of the world’s population. Distinctions of national identity and history were largely ignored.
On Nov. 1, however, 1,200 works from the collection were returned to new, brilliantly designed rooms grouped by geography: Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia and Later South Asia.

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About Connections And Nature And Other Things

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The large, orange-and- white fox stands erect, balanced on a sphere in the middle of a miniature green and stone formal garden — maybe Italian, maybe French. A river meanders in lazy curves on the right. The fox holds a simple costume-party mask. There are two butterflies.

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Leaving Architecture For Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Adam Van Doren, grandson of Mark, studied architecture with Robert A. M. Stern, surely the most famous architecture educator in the country.
But practicing architecture was not for Van Doren, who decided to make a career in art. Now he is exhibiting new work at his friend Darren Winston’s book shop in Sharon.

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Painting With Fire

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

It started as an accident, this business of painting with fire. Now it’s just the way Eduardo Giannattasio works, as he demonstrated on the front lawn of Lakeville’s White Gallery, Saturday.
Wearing a black beret and windbreaker, cigar firmly in mouth, Giannattasio turned on the African drumming he always works to and proceeded to squirt crimson pigment from a hypodermic needle onto a white board.
Then he added black coloring, burnt umber, violet, shaping his pigments in graceful arcs.

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From Night To Day

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Darkness ebbs slowly. Especially for a reticent fellow like John Atchley.
In recent years this Salisbury resident has suffered fire, losing his house; flood, losing his stored photographs; and, after rebuilding, a plague of carpenter ants.
“They were dropping from the ceiling on us.
“Biblical,” he called it.
Then Atchley did something brave.

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