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Childhood in Sun And Shadow

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

James Meyer’s art is about the 1960s childhood he remembers from growing up on Long Island. It is filled with sun and shadow, innocence and menace. His suburbia is a world of false promises and unfulfilled dreams, a redoubt against the world outside and the dangers of growing up.

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Art in Salisbury

James Meyer installed his playful images in watercolor, aluminum, and mylar earlier this week for the opening of Rock, Paper, Scissors at The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery, through April 22. For information, call 860-435-2591.

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Of Moods And Seasons

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Robert Kipniss, a part-time resident of Sharon, is a painter of trees and leaves and ghostly landscapes. And like the artist himself, the pictures are controlled, masterful, often haunting and even (unlike the artist) a bit menacing. His trees can seem about to deconstruct, his leaves to fly away.
Now 11 of the artist’s new works — most are from 2011 — are on exhibit at Franklin Riehlman Fine Art in New York City.

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Flight

Fran Forman’s “Flight” is among her pieces of photographic collage at Sohn Fine Art Gallery, in Stockbridge, MA, through March 19. For information, call 413-298-1025 or go to www.sohnfineart.com

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Art, Earnest and Likable At New Show in Sharon

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Karen Kellogg’s paintings remind me of a picture I inherited from my mother. It is a Texas scene of yellowish hills, low mesquite trees, fields of bluebonnets and cactus. Nothing is quite right: the perspective is off, the trees unnatural, the cactus out of shape. Yet I keep it for the memories of my grandmother and mother and Texas, and I like it.

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A Lament for Lost Dreams

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Fabricated, The latest Tremaine Gallery show at The Hotchkiss School, explores, through photography, the power of manmade structures, how they can shape or reflect our values and, in deterioration, become metaphors for lost hopes and failed dreams.
The show is about fact, fiction and symbols; and about where the descriptive and artistic aspects of photography merge.

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Remembering An Artist

leong@lakevillejournal.com

The large meeting hall in Vail was cold: Clive Davis, the most famous pop music record man in America, believed cold kept audiences awake. And he wanted us Bertelsmann music executives from around the world alert: He was about to play the first single from his star Whitney Houston’s new album, “The Bodyguard.”

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Cartoonist and Writer, Peter Steiner, Exhibits His Paintings

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Peter Steiner’s show of recent paintings at the Norfolk Library might be expected from a man of catholic interests and a varied professional background.
Steiner, who holds a Ph.D. in German literature, taught the subject for eight years at Dickinson College before leaving, in 1978, to try to become a professional artist. But it was from cartooning, that specialized skill of the outsider looking into society and poking fun at what he sees, that he earned his keep.

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There’s Something About Birds

The Art Scene

A collection of more than 30 hand-colored prints taken from John James Audubon’s masterwork “The Birds of America” are on view at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield.
Here in the museum’s spacious galleries are Audubon’s audacious, life-sized portraits of birds, created over a 13-year period with the help of many friends, above all his wife, Lucy, and the brilliant British engraver Robert Havell Jr., on the largest paper available at the time, “double elephant” size.

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Camera Club Opens New Show

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Four stunning images are among the fine work on display at the Housatonic Camera Club’s annual exhibition and sale at Noble Horizons.
In “Simply Adobe, 1-4,” from Birgitt Pajarola’s suite of four square photographs, hung in a square arrangement, the light and dusky colors of the American Southwest seem to glow on the white wall. The pictures are all pale browns with accents from colored doors or windows; they are framed tight, part of a wall or a house in extreme close-up, and laminated on thick board so they push into the gallery itself.

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