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Art

Astonishing Craft and Color at The White Gallery

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Quilts, those homey creations of rural and small-town American women in the 19th and much of the 20th centuries, sometimes — in the creative, talented hands of some quilters — rose to the level of great folk art. Now Kate Stiassni, former CBS employee and home designer, takes quilting techniques and applies a contemporary sensibility to make fine art wall textiles, some of which are on display at The White Gallery in Lakeville, CT.

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The Pleasures, Surprises And Questions Art Can inspire

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

There are some pleasures in “Enjoying Small Things,” the juried exhibition of 59 works now at The Sharon Historical Society. Pieter Lefferts, the single judge, gave prizes to three artists and honorable mentions to three others.
Why he singled out the winning works is not clear, but that is the nature of art and individual reactions to it.

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Inchoate? Perhaps, But Entertaining, Certainly

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

What can be made of Earth, Wind and Fire, the large, inchoate exhibition at Gallery Arts Guild in Lakeville, CT? Too many artists, too many pieces and objects, many small, all competing for attention despite the intelligent way the show is hung and laid out. Editing by both artists and gallery owners would have resulted in a more coherent experience, especially since there is some nice work on display.

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Images Describing A Terrible Time . . .

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Avery Danziger’s photographs of the defunct, deteriorating Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center in Wingdale, NY, are both gorgeous and ineffably sad. They record an institution rushing to destroy any record of itself and its sad purpose or of the sad patients it served. The hospital seems alive in its determined return to chaos.

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Modern Masters

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

They are India ink on paper, this suite of seven abstract and deconstructed female nudes, and they may be the most compelling pictures in Billy Morrison’s new show of works from Hans Hoffman and Alexander Liberman. These busy, flat images by Hoffman prefigure
Willem de Kooning’s third “Woman” series of paintings that were among the jewels in the Museum of Modern Art’s de Kooning retrospective last fall.

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Combining Movies, Food and Art

compass@lakevillejournal.com

A long time ago, somebody figured out that food and movies go together. So when Janet Crawshaw, associate publisher of The Valley Table, a magazine devoted to all things edible in New York’s Hudson Valley, announced that the sixth annual restaurant week would include four new restaurants in the northeastern part of the valley, Bob and Carol Sadlon got an idea.

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Strange, Compelling Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Barry Kieselstein-Cord once sat atop a kingdom built on his simple yet dramatic jewelry — concha belts, odd heavy bracelets and necklaces and pendants — unlike any in the upscale, non-precious stone market of the early 1980s. His pieces were carried by Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman, where his first shop-in-shop eventually led to freestanding stores in a dozen international cities. He won two Coty awards and was among the most influential designers in America. Then it all went south.

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A Painter Looks At Walmart, And Us

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

In the center of The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery someone has parked a shopping cart, the kind we push around grocery stores, except this one belongs to Walmart and is placed to dramatize the link between art and big-store commerce — the art being Brendan O’Connell’s bold, hectic canvases painted from (mostly) his photographs of Walmart.

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Leaving In, Also Leaving Out

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Susan Ferrari Rowley’s sculpture is about opposites and paradoxes: yielding and unyielding materials, volume and its absence, light and shadow. Pieces seem almost weightless, fragile; yet they occupy large spaces. They are difficult at first, peculiar, almost too simple. But quickly you discover their complexity: What is absent is as important as what is there in Rowley’s glowing pieces.

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Small and Telling

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Ann E. Coulter, the Illinois-based artist who Judith Singelis first brought to Argazzi Gallery several years ago, is back in Lakeville with a stunning show of her pastels. This time, however, the work is small and delicate rather than large, and it asks the viewer to come close and reflect, to consider time and nature, the past and perhaps the present.
Coulter is a master of place and mood, trees and leaves, light and shadow. Her drawings describe places and times that paradoxically seem timeless, and she hints at the changed way we perceive nature in the contemporary world.

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