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Art

From Night To Day

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Darkness ebbs slowly. Especially for a reticent fellow like John Atchley.
In recent years this Salisbury resident has suffered fire, losing his house; flood, losing his stored photographs; and, after rebuilding, a plague of carpenter ants.
“They were dropping from the ceiling on us.
“Biblical,” he called it.
Then Atchley did something brave.

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So French, So Telling

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The little boy is running home from the neighborhood boulangerie, his family’s daily baguette tucked under one arm. You can almost sense his motion, feel his excitement. It’s 1952, and you are in Paris with him.

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A Varied And Rewarding Show

Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Hotchkiss was shrewd to open its new “Faculty Select” art exhibition on Oct. 15 as part of parents’ weekend. The school has an excellent visual art faculty that covers painting, ceramics, photography and digital drawing and animation; and their individual work can be impressive.

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Country Scenes And Wild Animals In Area Libraries

The Art Scene

Two local libraries have opened art shows by known painters. Susan Rand’s solo show, her first, at the Norfolk Library, is a delightful surprise. Rand has filtered the styles of others — most noticeably, perhaps, Eric Aho — into her own singular interpretations of quiet scenes of farms, seascapes and even abandoned buildings. She has always used strong geometric lines, heavy brush strokes and thick paint. But now there is new tension and feeling in her work as well.

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Gray Shines at The Morrison

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Cleve Gray’s work always looks good in The Morrison Gallery’s expanse of white walls and gleaming wood floors. Gray was a Morrison artist from the first days of the gallery, and William Morrison has returned to Gray’s abstract impressionist paintings frequently. Now Morrison is showing a fine collection of 20 pictures from the early 1960s, when Gray ­­­— influenced by contemporaries such as Pollock, Rothko and Frankenthaler — began producing large paintings made with non-traditional techniques.

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A Life in Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Few painters have written autobiographies, and only Benvenuto Cellini’s is remembered. Yet Robert Kipniss, the widely recognized and collected painter and print artist (and part-time resident of Sharon), felt compelled to share his story of struggle, obstinacy and tenacity in “Robert Kipniss: A Working Artist’s Life.”
“This is the kind of book I wished for when I was young. It’s about how hard it is to establish a career in art, much less earn a living from it,” he says.

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LeSage at Ober; 9/11 at Hotchkiss

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Rob Ober has filled his bright gallery with both color and texture in his show of paintings by Karen LeSage and sculptures and works on paper by Elaine Housman.
LeSage is a known quantity among landscape painters in the area. Her pictures are made of horizontal bands of color textured to suggest grass or trees or sky. While they suggest traditional landscapes, they are more abstract, almost color field paintings. But unlike color field pieces, LeSage’s glow rather than lie flat on the canvas.

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Fascinating . . . And Fun, A Crowd Pleaser

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Mary Close is a talented, meticulous artist. In her new show, “The Fabric of Our Town” at The White Gallery in Lakeville, she has abandoned her figurative and still life painting for a new medium, photomosaic.
Using a computer program — Andrea Mosaic — and hundreds of photographs, she has combined technology and art to fashion a small but varied collection of prints that focuses on what she calls “the fabric of our town, Salisbury,” but also includes explorations of flowers, people, nature and even food.

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Life Changes the Artist . . . And the Art

The Art Scene

Michael Kessler is a painter of abstract landscapes with a difference: He is all about natural processes — erosion, sedimentation, layering — the way nature builds up the landscapes we see. But this was not always so.

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Glorious, Glorious Collectors

Art Excursion

They met in Baltimore — Claribel and Etta Cone, Gertrude and Leo Stein — in the late 1890s at Claribel’s Saturday evening salons, two sets of siblings who would amass unrivaled collections of European art during the first half of the 20th century.
From wealthy Jewish families, all four ventured to Paris, the Steins to live abroad for the rest of their lives, the Cones for several long visits. And all met artists who would become their friends and, eventually, icons of modern art.

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