Login

Art

Four Greats in Kent

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Bill Morrison included four big names in his Kent gallery’s winter exhibition: Hans Hofmann, Wolf Kahn, Cleve Gray and Jonathan Prince, the baby of the group.
Hofmann, who died 45 years ago, was a giant of abstract expressionism, and painters such as Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, Larry Rivers and Red Grooms studied with him; and Kahn became his studio assistant.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Bold & Artful

Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

In the early days of Sports Illustrated, when it was home to great sports writers, photographers and illustrators, its art director — the late Harvey Grut — commissioned an eight-page spread of Canada geese hunters from Robert M. Cunningham, an up-and-coming painter and illustrator. And so began a career that made Cunningham’s work famous in other magazines, on arts posters and on a series of U.S. postage stamps celebrating the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, NY. In 1998 he earned a place in the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Four Painters, Then and Now

Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

One of the first exhibition posters I bought after moving to New York City in 1970 was an Edward Avedisian from the famous Robert Elkon Gallery: An intense yellow sphere and a smaller, green one hung against a night-blue background. Sort of a blunt, minimalist, visual precis of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Aiming for Mood

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Colleen McGuire is a long, tall drink of water, cool and dressed in black at the opening of her one-woman show at Sharon’s Hotchkiss Library last Sunday. She is elegant and angular, as are her architectural paintings, the best work on display.
McGuire, who studied art at SUNY/Purchase, has fiddled with themes and styles through a relatively short career. Now, she says, she has reduced her palette, concentrated on composition, removed the extraneous details that troubled her work in the past and aims to deliver heightened mood.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.