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A Lament for Lost Dreams

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Fabricated, The latest Tremaine Gallery show at The Hotchkiss School, explores, through photography, the power of manmade structures, how they can shape or reflect our values and, in deterioration, become metaphors for lost hopes and failed dreams.
The show is about fact, fiction and symbols; and about where the descriptive and artistic aspects of photography merge.

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Remembering An Artist

leong@lakevillejournal.com

The large meeting hall in Vail was cold: Clive Davis, the most famous pop music record man in America, believed cold kept audiences awake. And he wanted us Bertelsmann music executives from around the world alert: He was about to play the first single from his star Whitney Houston’s new album, “The Bodyguard.”

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Cartoonist and Writer, Peter Steiner, Exhibits His Paintings

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Peter Steiner’s show of recent paintings at the Norfolk Library might be expected from a man of catholic interests and a varied professional background.
Steiner, who holds a Ph.D. in German literature, taught the subject for eight years at Dickinson College before leaving, in 1978, to try to become a professional artist. But it was from cartooning, that specialized skill of the outsider looking into society and poking fun at what he sees, that he earned his keep.

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There’s Something About Birds

The Art Scene

A collection of more than 30 hand-colored prints taken from John James Audubon’s masterwork “The Birds of America” are on view at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield.
Here in the museum’s spacious galleries are Audubon’s audacious, life-sized portraits of birds, created over a 13-year period with the help of many friends, above all his wife, Lucy, and the brilliant British engraver Robert Havell Jr., on the largest paper available at the time, “double elephant” size.

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Camera Club Opens New Show

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Four stunning images are among the fine work on display at the Housatonic Camera Club’s annual exhibition and sale at Noble Horizons.
In “Simply Adobe, 1-4,” from Birgitt Pajarola’s suite of four square photographs, hung in a square arrangement, the light and dusky colors of the American Southwest seem to glow on the white wall. The pictures are all pale browns with accents from colored doors or windows; they are framed tight, part of a wall or a house in extreme close-up, and laminated on thick board so they push into the gallery itself.

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Woytuck’s Figures Move onto Broadway

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

There they are, two full-size bronze elephants in Columbus Circle. One looks south, trunk raised in greeting; the other gazes north, up Broadway, with a large red apple nestled in its curving trunk. Peter Woytuck's whimsical, soothing sculptures are visiting the city. And they seem a little overwhelmed.

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Small Lessons

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The small show of photographs at Eckert Fine Art in Millerton, NY, is a small lesson in the last 70 years of American photography.
Alfred Eisenstaedt is represented by a busy, cluttered 1938 shot of Thomas Hart Benton painting “The Rape of Persephone.” The artist stands in front of his already full canvas, brush in right hand, pipe in mouth, dressed in shirt, tie and slacks. He looks down on a nude model who is recumbent, back to us, on a chaise. He looks more like the art teacher he was than the painter of flowing, folksy regional art he became after turning his back on New York.

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Of Waves and Tools

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

You can almost smell the tang of sea air and hear the lapping of waves in Chris Armstrong’s meticulously painted, luminous waterscapes on view at the Morrison Gallery in Kent.
Armstrong, who lives in Gloucester, MA, where the sea informs the town and its rhythms, is a keen observer of the ocean’s unpredictability and vastness. His seas change color — from gentle blues to darker, ominous blackish tones — under the changing light of morning, midday and twilight. The paintings seem in motion: calm or rolling, gentle or agitated, pacific or angry.

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All About Transcendence

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

It begins as corrugated board and ends as sculpture. Henry Klimowicz takes the board from what he calls its “base moment” and gives it form in muscular, organic pieces that are strong, evocative and surprisingly beautiful. Now a cross section of his newer work is on exhibition at the Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery in a dramatic, eye-opening show.

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A Show of Color and Depth

leong@lakevillejournal.com

Color is what grabs you in Tina Chandler’s charming solo art show at Sharon’s Hotchkiss Library.
Chandler paints with pastel sticks made from pure pigment and a neutral binder: an arsenal of intense, vivid colors that result in pictures of immediate intensity. There is both simplicity and honesty in these pieces, as well as a child-like appreciation of the joy of color.

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