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Lots of Celebrities And an Artist’s Eye

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

At 35 and 82, Marilyn Monroe and Carl Sandburg seem an odd pairing. Yet there they are, only eight months before Monroe’s death, chatting and even dancing in four of the remarkable photographs by Arnold Newman now on view at Joie de Livres Gallery @ Salisbury Wines.

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A Chance To Look at Some Youthful Art At Youthful Art

Art Scene
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

This weekend’s “Blue and Gold at the White” show, at The White Gallery in Lakeville, features the work of 45 students from Housatonic Valley Regional High School. Sixty works will be on view in acrylic, watercolor, gouache, and including mixed media, photography, printmaking, monoprints, animation and sculpture.
Dropping by teacher Warren Prindle’s advanced painting class the other day, I was struck by the seriousness in the room.

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Drawn Into Another World

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Jane Eckert’s new gallery in Millerton, NY, is much like its owner: sophisticated, warm, eclectic.
When Will Little (who is chairman of The Lakeville Journal Company in full disclosure) and Andrew Gates invited her to relocate from Kent and take over half the building at 34 Main St., just vacated by The Gilded Moon, they told her she would have a congenial neighbor — their own Little Gates Wine Merchants — in the other half.
“I jumped at the chance to join in Millerton’s vibrancy and be closer to many clients and my own house in Millbrook,” she told me.

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A Second White Gallery Opens

Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

A second White Gallery, the first being smack in the middle of Lakeville, is opening Friday, on Route 7 in Great Barrington.
The clapboard building, with white walls, bared beams and an old brick oven, was once a home. Now it’s a place to show art.
The featured painter for this first show is one of gallery directors Susan and Tino Galluzzo’s favorites, David Dunlop.
“He’s a good friend and a phenomenal artist and educator,” Tino Galluzzo told me during a tour of the new showplace.

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Excursion: Cézanne at the Met

leong@lakevillejournal.com

Paul Cézanne was the bridge between impressionism and the bold, new way of seeing that began with cubism.
Working in isolation and exhibiting little after his early years in Paris, he probed the structure of his subjects: Fruit and trees and even tables pulse on the edge of becoming essential spheres, cylinders, rectangles.

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Franco’s People: Mostly Poor, Always Singular

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

During my early days in Greenwich Village, spring warmth was heralded by a man and his albino ball python: The snake, large enough to mesmerize the eye, coiled itself around the branches of a newly budded tree, sunning and only occasionally moving. Its owner, heavily tattooed before skin art was so ubiquitous, answered questions from fascinated — if terrified — spectators.

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Four Greats in Kent

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Bill Morrison included four big names in his Kent gallery’s winter exhibition: Hans Hofmann, Wolf Kahn, Cleve Gray and Jonathan Prince, the baby of the group.
Hofmann, who died 45 years ago, was a giant of abstract expressionism, and painters such as Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, Larry Rivers and Red Grooms studied with him; and Kahn became his studio assistant.

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Bold & Artful

Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

In the early days of Sports Illustrated, when it was home to great sports writers, photographers and illustrators, its art director — the late Harvey Grut — commissioned an eight-page spread of Canada geese hunters from Robert M. Cunningham, an up-and-coming painter and illustrator. And so began a career that made Cunningham’s work famous in other magazines, on arts posters and on a series of U.S. postage stamps celebrating the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, NY. In 1998 he earned a place in the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame.

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Four Painters, Then and Now

Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

One of the first exhibition posters I bought after moving to New York City in 1970 was an Edward Avedisian from the famous Robert Elkon Gallery: An intense yellow sphere and a smaller, green one hung against a night-blue background. Sort of a blunt, minimalist, visual precis of Van Gogh’s “Starry Night.”

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Aiming for Mood

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Colleen McGuire is a long, tall drink of water, cool and dressed in black at the opening of her one-woman show at Sharon’s Hotchkiss Library last Sunday. She is elegant and angular, as are her architectural paintings, the best work on display.
McGuire, who studied art at SUNY/Purchase, has fiddled with themes and styles through a relatively short career. Now, she says, she has reduced her palette, concentrated on composition, removed the extraneous details that troubled her work in the past and aims to deliver heightened mood.

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