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Art

An Artist’s View: Moving the Work

Art

Saturday morning, Nov. 5, in Kent, you may have heard the rumble of a diesel engine outside the Ober Gallery as a large excavator came to life, lifting a heavy stone sculpture.
Tipping the 20-foot-high piece on its side to wrap it in nylon straps, a small crew held their breath as its full 1,500 pounds slowly left the ground. The capable hands of Vinnie the backhoe operator allowed no harm to come to the piece as he gently set it in the steel bed of a heavy duty trailer. Then, the work began.

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Molding Clay Into Masks

Art

Some masks are meant to conceal, as with bank robbers, say, or dancers at a Venetian ball. People are more daring when their features are obscured. 
Then there are death masks, using casts made of mates or children or historic figures, such as Abraham Lincoln, after they have taken their last breath. (Lincoln actually had a mask made before his assassination, and another was made after, according to Wikipedia.) The Victorians were fond of these masks, it seems. Phrenologists, too. They thought bumps on the head revealed character traits. 

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A Style Evolving Into Abstract

Art

The appeal of Victor Mirabelli’s paintings is immediate. Both impressionistic and abstract, the contrast between white structures — abandoned farm buildings, alone or in groups — and gauzy, feathery landscape draws you into the picture and its possible story. 

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Where land and sky meet

Art

Paintings by northwestern Connecticut resident Leora Armstrong are currently on display through Nov. 13 at Darren Winston, Bookseller in Sharon. The works are inspired by the memories of her childhood growing up on the remote Isle of Islay, off the western coast of Scotland. Armstrong’s work will next be on display at Place, an art gallery and studio located at 3 Main St. in Millerton. An opening reception will be held Saturday, Nov. 12, from 4 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will be on display at Place through Jan. 6.

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Two Museums, Two Views

Art

North Canaan resident Tom Zetterstrom has a photograph on display at the Wadsworth Athaneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Conn.

The image was one of seven Zetterstrom pieces purchased by American curator and fine arts collector Samuel Wagstaff. In the early 1970s, Wagstaff began collecting what would amount to over 26,000 works of fine art photography.

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Dazzling Vistas

Art

He’s back. David Dunlop — the voluble fellow who peppers a 10-minute chat with quotes from Picasso, Gombrich, Billy Collins, Homer (not sure which one) and Picasso again — is back at The White Gallery in Lakeville with 18 new paintings, most of them local vistas which he scouted out, photographed and sketched before painting them in blue and gold and green oils on linen, copper or aluminum.
For lovers of these handsome landscapes, it is dazzling.

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At Last, Making Time for Art

Art

A retired federal judge, a former reporter for CBS News, a man whose degree in photography was followed by 35 years in the construction business. These and nine other artists who, after years in careers or full-time parenting, now make art with enthusiasm, even passion, are showing work in “Second Act: The Artist’s Life at Last,” a new show at Noble Horizons in Salisbury.

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Artisans Show Works of Clay

Art: Clay Way Studio Tour

For the three days that comprise Columbus Day Weekend (Oct. 8, 9 and 10), 18 area clay artists will present an inaugural studio tour called Clay Way. The tour of the clay studios in western Connecticut and nearby New York welcomes visitors with the encouragement to visit as many of the nearby studios as they can.
Clay Way is the inspiration of Woodbury potter and tile maker Linda Boston, who saw the pottery weekends for studios in Massachusetts, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota and thought, “Why not in Connecticut?”

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Two Brothers, One Exhibit

When Allen Blagden was growing up, his father, Thomas Peabody Blagden, a patrician and courtly fellow who headed The Hotchkiss School’s art department in Lakeville, would pass out art supplies to his offspring, and Allen and his sisters would paint and draw in the afternoons.
“I cared about art, but I was absolutely not interested in a career in art,” Allen says.

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Eckert Fine Art Returns to Kent

Art

After stints in Kent, then Millerton and finally Shekomeko, N.Y., Jane Eckert has returned to Kent and created a gallery in the Kent Barns complex where the yarn store used to be. After new landscaping by the Barns’ owners, she will face James Barron’s gallery across a lovely planted pedestrian area where cars used to park.

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