Login

Art

Nature Seen In A New Light

Art: ‘New Works: Sarah Martinez and Lilly Woodworth’

Sarah Martinez and Lilly Woodworth both paint nature — impressions, memories, abstractions — in surprising color combinations that jar or gently lure the eye into seeing something familiar in a new way. Contrasts and similarities between the two artists can now be compared in “New Works: Sarah Martinez and Lilly Woodworth,” the current show at The White Gallery in Lakeville.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Local, Natural Beauty

Art

North Elm Home’s gallery wall, washed in brilliant but not-too-harsh white light, is the perfect place to enjoy Jack Limpert’s 16 gentle paintings now on exhibit there. 
Limpert, who is neither a trained nor professional artist, brings a fine eye and design sense — he was creative director of a leading catalog and direct sales company for years — to his work, which is never sentimental nor saccharine.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Full of detail, power

Early in her career, Dawn Clements drew and colored images of the human body and organs for a medical publisher. Her attention to detail and accuracy was better than anyone’s they had ever used.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Bronzes Will Make You Smile

Art: ‘Peter Woytuck: Unique 2017’

Peter Woytuck is back, but only long enough to put together a delightful show of small bronzes that will open at Argazzi Art in Lake­ville on Saturday, July 22.
In person, Woytuck is soft spoken, a little shy, with an “aw shucks” demeanor like a schoolboy — until he talks about making and patinating his sculptures. You can almost see the blowtorch in his hand, the pigment ready to brush on hot metal; almost hear and feel him polishing for his lustrous finishes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Juried art show in Kent

 
The Kent Art Association’s Juried Presidents Show is on display through Aug. 6 at 21 South Main St. in Kent. It is open Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Two judges, artists Ann Kromer of Ridgefield and Paul Gould of Cornwall, selected the winners in each of several categories. Above, KAA President Connie Horton, left, presented the award for Best in Show to Laura Pulatti. For details, go to www.kentart.org or call 860-927-3989.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Truly Eye-Opening Tour

compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s fascinating to watch artists work in their own studios. Rather than simply looking at a painting on a wall or a piece of jewelry on a rack, you get to watch the creative process of the artist. You can ask questions. And in the end, you might feel more connected to the finished product after catching a glimpse at its creation.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

An Art Tour Of NYC: Museums And Mutations

My wife and daughter were out of town last month. My sister called to tell me that she and my brother-in-law were going away for the weekend and to invite me to stay in their New York City apartment. I haven’t been on my own in the city since I lived there and was single, so I jumped at the chance.
As it happened, the first person I mentioned my plans to was Leon Graham, Compass’s resident art critic. He immediately laid out a list of art-related places to go and things to see. So now my weekend had a theme.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Kent To NYC, Figures Bring Joy

The New Yorker magazine called the figures “zaftig … like Teletubbies that grew up.” Their installation on New York City’s Broadway Mall — a linear park that extends from 70th Street to 168th — overnight in mid-May caused hurrying West Siders to stop and gawk, then smile with surprise. Many touched or even sat on some of the nine sculptures.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Triangles Transform From Shapes To Art

Art: ‘Kate Stiassni: Spatial Relations’

Kate Stiassni continues pushing the boundaries of contemporary fabric art in her new show, “Spatial Relations,” at The White Gallery in Lakeville. Her usual vibrant colors are there, but so is a new concern for the relationship of her abstract figures to each other and to the empty space around them.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Crafting Unique Stories With Shadows And Found Objects

Art: Conrad Levenson’s ‘Forms and Shadows’

Each sculpture by Conrad Levenson tells a story. The Stanfordville artist takes found objects — rusty pieces of metal, chains, discarded tools — and gives them a new life.
“I have all these objects and I respond to what they’re telling me,” he said while setting up his solo exhibition at North Elm Home, a furnishing and antiques store in Millerton. “Usually I take objects with no prior relationship to each other and then bring them together in one piece. That’s part of the fun.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.